Thursday, October 01, 2009

October Is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

28 comments:

redronnie said...

I have a dual reaction when I see the colour pink used to represent Breast Cancer, it has forever altered the images associated with cute little baby girls, adorable cubby babys with the sweetest little smiles. I feel guilty of the resentment I feel or the anger at the hideous painful disease the colour pink has come to represent. No doubt many of you will support and defend the choice of using pink to represent this insidious disease, that's your right. But to me and my sisters, breast cancer killed my grand-aunt and mother and pink somehow takes away the painful reality of breast cancer. There was no pink in my mother's hospital room when she died and we did not float pink balloons, nor did we later run out and purchase pink vacuum cleaners, cooking utensils, key chains, water bottles or countless other items available to purchase in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we just send an annual cheque to cancer research in their name and memory.

mikey said...

redronnie, I am so sorry for your losses. Please don't feel guilty -You are not the first person I have heard against the pink. I have two friends currently going through treatment, and they have expressed the same feelings about the pink you have. Hugs to you.

A Pimp Named DaveR said...

Is anyone actually "unaware" of breast cancer at this point, such that we need to increase awareness?

Green Wave Gal said...

Sorry for your losses redronnie and best wishes to your friends mikey.

For me, the pink is now empowering. As some CDaN-ers know I had 2 tumors removed (one in each breast) in May. Thankfully they turned out benign. For me, the pink now represents awareness and hope. It reminds me to take care of myself and not put off whatever may be ailing me or what I may be afraid of. (I even tattooed a pink ribbon inside a heart on my wrist) You can see it here if you'd like: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=6992477&l=49cb6a03a4&id=789540404

Green Wave Gal said...

@Pimp: I think a lot of people think it can't happen to them..

bramblewitch said...

Well, I got diagnosed 5 years ago next month and one of my best friends went out and bought me a pink ribbon bathrobe (to use during treatment) and pink ribbon socks, etc. I knew (and know now) she was trying to be supportive, but I was secretly mortified and couldn't get rid of that stuff soon enough. I have neutral feelings to it now.

Babs said...

Pimp - I think the quest for awareness isn't so much for the disease itself, but for the symptoms and the ways in which to prevent it or discover it early. Early detection = a better chance for a cure.

Sue Ellen Mishkey said...

I am not adverse to the pink, however I have never had cancer(fingers crossed), but I really hated the yellow Livestrong bracelets, so I understand where you're coming from. Then again, maybe I don't and won't unless I went through the same thing.

JJ said...

There's always the next generation of young girls who are clueless about breast cancer and monthly self exams. Try and think of BC awareness month being geared towards them.

I have several pink ribbon items that I cherish but I agree sometimes they are used as cheap marketing.

Beautiful tat GWG!

chihuahuense said...

I just don't like it when a company "supports BC" by jacking up the price on one of their items, makes it pink, and then donates a penny to BC for every one sold. That should be criminal.

A Pimp Named DaveR said...

@GWG and Babs: That does make sense. I now see!

Karmen said...

I think I'm one of the few who likes the pink ribbons. I didn't realize there was such an aversion to it until reading all these posts. My sorority's philanthropy is Breast Cancer Education and Awareness. In fact, the slogan "Think Pink!" is our registered trademark. Their strong involvement is one of the reasons why I choose it.

I think the pink is cute (probably cause it's my favorite color), and I always loved seeing all the survivors decked out in pink at Race For The Cure. They just seemed so strong and happy.

Much love to all those affected by this horrible disease.

chihuahuense said...

one more thing, and I'm sure this will piss you off (I hope not). But I don't like the fact that some cancers get massive PR and others don't. PR=money=cure. Why doesn't colon cancer have a ribbon or a slogan or liver cancer, etc, etc? I don't think that bc should get *LESS* PR, just that all other cancer should get more, I guess.

redronnie said...

Yes, I do see your point about hope and the wonderful visual of strong, healthy survivors decked out in pink. Perhaps the pain is too fresh and maybe because my sisters and I are still holding our breath during our checkups

GWG and Bramblewitch, if I could I would..
deep hugs thanks everyone, love to all

Green Wave Gal said...

FYI...I'm *only* 34. Very aware of cancer as different types have affected my dad and grandparents, but I have no history of breast cancer.

Yes, I think all cancers deserve the awareness.

@JJ: Thanks. It's very special to me.

@Pimp: Thanks for 'listening'. :)

secmatson said...

12 years ago my mother in-law contracted breast cancer. She fought it and won. 7 years ago, the drugs she was taking to keep the breast cancer away gave her bone cancer. She had had enough and didn't want to fight again and died February 10, 2003. This weekend my family will jog in the Run Against Breast Cancer here in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada to show our support for fighters, survivors and those who didn't make it. For Shirley.

Idiot Watcher said...

While I agree that the pink electric mixers and blenders and baseball caps are taking things to a bit of a commercialist extreme, I think it is always very useful for campaigns such as breast cancer awareness to have some sort of recognizable symbol that conveys its meaning and message without having to use a lot of excess verbiage. I also understand the aversion to the actual color itself, although I think the intent was to choose something "feminine" to show that it's a women's issue, and that women have solidarity against the disease. Of course, that is unnecessarily alienating to all of the men who (silently) suffer through breast cancer...

Kimberly said...

As someone with a family history of breast cancer, there cannot be too many education campaigns. I just had an abnormal mammogram 13 days ago, after the first abnormal one in March 2009. I'm scared shitless, but will go back in March 2010 for another follow up.

I just turned 36 years old 30 days ago.

jax said...

Pimp, i thought like you until i found 3 lumps last month and thought the worst.

i found out monday that i just have a lumpy boob. changed my life to hear that because i know i am very lucky.

ladies- ask your doc to do a breast exam everytime! it takes only a few minutes.

to those who have suffered or suffered a loss, may you find some peace in the good thoughts and positive energy being sent to you from CDAN readers!

Majik said...

I work with cancer patients--you cannot imagine the horror of a festering tumor that is growing through the skin and fungating. The smell alone is enough to make you throw up. Yet women--INTELLIGENT, EDUCATED women--STILL come in with these things. Why? Denial. "It's not cancer, I think it's getting smaller, it's just an infected pimple/cyst/boil, etc."

It's sad...moreso because these women would have had an excellent prognosis if they had gotten mammograms when the lump first appeared (btw--a lump the size of a quarter, if malignant, is already considered "advanced" cancer).

Ladies, it's uncomfortable....but go get those boobies smooshed--it could save your life.

Majik said...

Oh, and btw....men can get breast cancer, too.

GladysKravitz said...

Thank you Enty.

There can never be too much education about any sort of cancer until there is a cure.

lutefisk said...

October is a very difficult month for those of us who have had breast cancer. Those pink ribbon displays are a painful reminder.
I have many friends who feel the same way as I do. I have to wonder how much of it is done to educate, & how much is done for pure profit.
Please, please take care of yourselves & have regular mammograms. I did not, since there was no history in my family, & I never thought breast cancer was a remote possibility. It is only through pure luck, & the grace of God that I found my own lump, which was large & rapidly growing, before it spread anywhere.
A few people were wondering where I have been---a few weeks ago I had my 6 month MRI, sonogram, & mammogram. A suspicious spot showed up in the same exact place as where I had the tumor removed. After having a biopsy, I found out it was nothing to be concerned over. But those few weeks were torture, having wondered if something returned, after going through radiation. Thank goodness this time it was nothing.

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JJ said...

Very relieved that it was nothing lutefisk. I'm too much of a wuss to go thru that wait again, which is why I just had them lopped off. I'm a chicken.

lutefisk said...

JJ, I have friends who did the same--this is the 4th spot I have had biopsied in 11 months--it is a horrid experience each time. I understand why people remove them. They would rather not have the worries over & over.
The important thing is that we are both healthy!

Mooshki said...

There's a VERY easy way to help out. Just go to thebreastcancersite.com and click on a button once a day. Your clicks pay for mammograms for people who can't afford them. The site also has a store with cute knickknacks if you're looking for a gift, and proceeds from the sales go to the fund.

About half of the women I know have either had breast cancer or have gone through a scare. I'm lucky that I haven't lost anyone yet to it, and I hope it stays that way.

As we were saying on facebook the other day, 'a healthy boob is a happy boob.' :)

lutefisk said...

Mooshki, can we get that on a
t-shirt?