Sunday, March 09, 2014

Blind Item #5

This serial cheater who got her start on that once huge reality show insists she is still married. She might be, but he is talking about getting married to his male co-star in a new, not in NYC stage production he is working on.

40 comments:

TalksTooMuch said...

That sounds complicated.

Derek Harvey said...

Nicole Richie and Joel Madden? They arent married are they?

texas rose said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Derek Harvey said...

yes they are married

sugarbread maker said...

kris jenner and anyone

lc said...

hey TTM-What is the reading material for the bookclub? Thought I would check it out.

hollywood dime said...

I had to read that 5x before I understood it.

Derek Harvey said...

@TTM My neighbor keeps playing the song Be my Baby Doll on repeat for 3 hours---do u know that classic?

Violet said...

That one from Smash - Katherine whatever? I know they separated but maybe not divorced yet.

TalksTooMuch said...

Hey Ic! It is "Sins of the Fathers" by Lawrence Block, a quick read. We would love to have you join! It's next Sunday

TalksTooMuch said...

Be My Baby Doll....doesn't ring a bell, will look up

Boishglamorpuss said...

McPhee.

TalksTooMuch said...

Oh that's Mariah Carey! No, I never got into her until "Heartbreaker", and that was totally a guilty pleasure

snookiemonster said...

Yep. Katherine McPhee

Derek Harvey said...

The version I am talking about is by a hair metal band called Big House. Think Brett Michaels style. The neighbor looks like he is from FUBAR lol--sorry waaaay OT!

Tina Mallette said...

Interesting

STAMFORD, Conn., Feb. 21, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- buildOn, an organization dedicated to ending the education crisis in the U.S. and around the world, announces today its partnership with Katharine McPhee and her husband Nick Cokas to expand its school building program to Burkina Faso in West Africa. Students from underserved high schools in the South Bronx and Brooklyn will join the village of Taga in Burkina Faso to break ground on the school today, February 21, 2014 - See more at: http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2014/02/21/612377/10069430/en/Nonprofit-buildOn-Partners-with-Katharine-McPhee-to-Expand-School-Building-Program-to-Burkina-Faso.html#sthash.ALXdkB73.dpuf

TalksTooMuch said...

LOL I think I even know that one! Hey! Did you see FUBAR 2? That was hil-AIR-rious, especially since I used to live in Fort Mac

Seven of Eleven said...

McPhee is so splendidly bland, I wonder how she keeps getting roles. Even when she's copying Hermione's look.

Seven of Eleven said...

Oh, wait, she has the traveling version of the magical cooch of destiny!

Count Jerkula said...

There is no education crisis in the US. There is a parenting crisis.

Sherry said...

I'm not clear on what's happening in this blind. I can see it's McPhee but what about her co-star marrying a guy? What the what?

Count do you really think the poor schools are all because of parents? Not being bitchy I'm truly curious. I will say I am glad I don't have kids to deal with the education issue. But I will also add I have friends who are teachers and they have issues with the schools too.

it took forever said...

@count i agree with you on this one

Count Jerkula said...

@Sherry: 90+% of the time, yes. Whether it is raising kids in shitty areas or thinking it is the schools job to raise their kids or being too consumed with themselves to pay attention to what their kid is doing.

You take a place like Camden NJ, where only 3 kids placed college ready on exams. Is that the school failing? No. That is the community failing. The school can only play the hand it is dealt. If they get shit in, they are going to churn out shit. Bulldoze the school, hire all new teachers and administrators, and you will have the same results.

About teachers complaining about schools, find me an employer that doesn't have employees who complain.

Courtney Madison said...

That pic was from 2010. I guess she had that look first. They do look very similar in that pic.

Alexa Rose said...

@Count, agree 100% that there is a major parenting crisis in the U.S. I would tell anyone to think very carefully before entering education as a career.

Renoblondee said...

I also agree with you @Count.

auntliddy said...

So if parenting is failing, cant schools step up?Is it wrong to help children?

auntliddy said...

So if parenting is failing, cant schools step up?Is it wrong to help children?

lc said...

Thanks TTM and btw...what is the web address of said book club?

TalksTooMuch said...

It's on my profile, for clicking, or:

www.webebookclubbin.blogspot.com

see you there!

Jonathan Andrew Sheen said...

Or, http://webebookclubbin.blogspot.com/

You're welcome.

TalksTooMuch said...

Thank you, JAS, will you be joining us? You strike me as someone who reads quite a bit

M. Brown said...

So right about the parenting crisis. The few really underperforming schools that have managed to turn themselves around have done so using extreme measures and basically parenting the students. Teachers are an easy target. Most of them are hardworking and caring with very few resources and support systems.

Sherry said...

Thanks Count. M.Brown understood my point. The teachers I know WANT to teach but feel hemmed in by all the testing that doesn't really do anything but disrupt the flow of actually teaching.

Standardized tests are created by people who don't adhere to the curriculum so when the tests arrive they've (students) never been taught what is on them. There seems to be a huge disconnect and it's extremely frustrating to teachers and students alike. Couple that with unnecessary tests just so the kids can "get used" to the real tests. It's showing to be a huge waste of money and time. SAD!

That said I wish you well. I seem to recall you have a kid? I will presume so since you've made the statement about the poor quality of education. As much as you may piss off people with your perviness I don't doubt you want the best education possible for your child. Kudos to you and I mean than without irony or rancor.

Sprink said...

'Rancor' is a glorious and underused word.

Count Jerkula said...

@Sherry: I don't listen to teachers complaining about standardized tests. I find it to be resentment that there is checks and balances in place to see if they are good at their job or pushing problems along.

iknowpeople said...

Jennifer Hudson

Sara said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dingle Barry said...

Count, you are absolutely correct about standardized tests. They are a measuring stick used to see if a teacher and school are progressing. Good schools will correct teacher issues with proper training and support, among other ways. Bad schools just teach students to pass those tests. Many parents from all socio-economic backgrounds are terrible parents and completely awful to teachers and administrators. The families that tend to struggle the most with schools and lack of support, are for the most part well meaning parents with kids that have special educational goals. Be it gifted, autism spectrum, physical disability (maybe not as much), even the more severe disabilities the schools are better equipped to handle. But pity the poor child, and their parents, who are fully capable and look or act different. Good teachers are all around us. Each district and each school is different in every community. That's not a bad thing. It's bad when these schools aren't allowed to succeed based on what works for their community. We aren't a cookie cutter nation, and our communities especially not. So, to pressure students to do well is ridiculous. Teach reading, writing, math, social studies. Forget this new curriculum that know one knows how to teach or help a child. What about 2 working parents with 4 kids? The single parent with 3 kids? If helping with too much homework, or homework that someone with a PhD can't decipher, then that curriculum doesn't work for the average family. As most families can't afford an after school tutor. I've told my children, right in front of their teachers, "Do the best job that you can do on the test, but don't worry about it. This test is to make sure your teacher taught you all that you needed to learn." Never has a teacher denied that to be the truth. My kids are all successful adults. Thanks to good teachers and my children's desire to succeed in their lives.

Dingle Barry said...

Count, you are absolutely correct about standardized tests. They are a measuring stick used to see if a teacher and school are progressing. Good schools will correct teacher issues with proper training and support, among other ways. Bad schools just teach students to pass those tests. Many parents from all socio-economic backgrounds are terrible parents and completely awful to teachers and administrators. The families that tend to struggle the most with schools and lack of support, are for the most part well meaning parents with kids that have special educational goals. Be it gifted, autism spectrum, physical disability (maybe not as much), even the more severe disabilities the schools are better equipped to handle. But pity the poor child, and their parents, who are fully capable and look or act different. Good teachers are all around us. Each district and each school is different in every community. That's not a bad thing. It's bad when these schools aren't allowed to succeed based on what works for their community. We aren't a cookie cutter nation, and our communities especially not. So, to pressure students to do well is ridiculous. Teach reading, writing, math, social studies. Forget this new curriculum that know one knows how to teach or help a child. What about 2 working parents with 4 kids? The single parent with 3 kids? If helping with too much homework, or homework that someone with a PhD can't decipher, then that curriculum doesn't work for the average family. As most families can't afford an after school tutor. I've told my children, right in front of their teachers, "Do the best job that you can do on the test, but don't worry about it. This test is to make sure your teacher taught you all that you needed to learn." Never has a teacher denied that to be the truth. My kids are all successful adults. Thanks to good teachers and my children's desire to succeed in their lives.