Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Woman Tries To Steal Newborn From Hospital


A 48 year old woman was arrested yesterday after she was caught by hospital employees trying to smuggle a newborn outside a Southern California hospital in a tote bag. Sensors attached to the baby alerted employees who stopped the woman after an alarm sounded when she crossed an imaginary line. The woman, posing as a nurse told the mother of the baby that she needed to take a shower before the doctor came to examine her. The woman then put the baby in a bag and tried to leave. Back in the day before these sensors, this kind of thing happened frequently. The baby was fine and was returned to her mother.

41 comments:

hunter said...

Wow, baby sensors. I guess that's a good thing.

FSP said...

"Sensors attached to the baby"

It is so sad that we've come to this.

Amber said...

This is OT but not really...look at THIS baby! https://twitter.com/christianmunthe/status/232782214906134528

Cleodacat said...

Glad to hear this turned out okay. Modern technology has come so far and I'm glad to see that it's getting put to use.

FSP said...

That's funny Amber.

djphob said...

Enty, why didn't you post about the man trying to trade his baby for food at a motel? It's always horrible woman stories lately! I'll just keep imagining you're baiting BoS. He does amuse me so.

djphob said...

@FSP I don't think we've really "come to this" so much as it's just we have that technology now. Baby-stealing is old as sin.

Amber said...

Isn't it cute, FSP? Do you think they make pygmy gorillas?

On the radio this morning, they were talking about this story. Someone mentioned another story where a "couple" was walking around knocking on doors at a motel trying to sell "their" baby to people for grocery money.

Sometimes I try to ignore the fact that this world is such a scary place, but other people's crazy makes me afraid to bring a child into it.

FSP said...

I'm sure they do Amber, after all they make pygmy giraffes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZM_3oayVW4

djphob said...

@amber that's the story I was talking about. It was just a dude though.

rejectedcarebear said...

When this happens they usually announce a 'code pink' which means someone (either the mom or baby) has left a restricted area while wearing the hospital bracelet (where the sensor is). My friend works in a hospital and this happens often, usually its the mom leaving to go smoke but every once in awhile its a baby snatcher. We had a high profile case in Pittsburgh where a lady murdered a pregnant teen that she befriended in a jail waiting room. The baby boy survived.

Mary Stewart-McGovern said...

RCB, in some hospitals, a "Code Pink" is when all available medical personnel are required in a delivery room. This happened when I had my youngest. She refused to cry and was horribly jaundiced, and we ended up with somewhere in the neighborhood of 20 doctors, nurses, and specialists in and out of our room within the first 20 minutes of her life.

(Not sure what they would have called as a code for missing child, though.)

rejectedcarebear said...

@Mary- i had a few friends who worked in hospitals in my area and thats what code pink meant in those places. I remember when my niece was born, she had some lung issues and was not able to breathe on her own for the first few weeks of her life, they always called a code blue when she would stop breathing. It so terrifying when babes are so sick like that, i hope your daughter is doing well!

GrowFarmington said...

"an alarm sounded when she crossed an imaginary line. "

Really? Imaginary?

Glad the baby is ok and hope this woman gets the mental health help she clearly needs.

Mary Stewart-McGovern said...

@RCB, she spent time in PICU during the first 3 weeks (jaundice that was responding to treatment, failure to thrive, etc.), but thankfully she's a very healthy, active, and smart 6 year old. Couldn't ask for more!

Hope your niece is doing well, too.

And I agree, terrifying is a good word to describe that feeling. (The only time the feeling reached horrifying was when the transplant team came in and asked if we were considering donating her organs, should she not make it.)

Brenda L said...

I wonder if there is a legit psychological diagnosis for this phenomena? Like someone else said, baby-stealing is old as sin.

AuntJess said...

Thank god for baby lo-jack. How about that woman in NYC last week sentenced to 20 years for something similar. She got 3 less years than the amount of time the girl was missing!

discoflux said...

Brenda - It's called dingo-itis.

Those alarms went off a couple of times over the two days i was in L&D, or whatever my drugged up ass was in, after my miscarriage. Both times it was because the mother spaced out, thankfully.

dirtydisher said...

Can you imagine someone putting your newborn in a bag? In a bag! Great they got her back, but, I would cry so much thinking of her in that mad woman's bag.

djphob said...

"Code Pink" is what we used for missing kids when I worked at a water park/resort, too.

Margaret said...

This has been around a while. They used the sensors when my daughter was born in 97. Glad the baby is safe with her mom.

Amy in MI said...

Yup it's baby LoJack. The sensors are before the doors in and out of maternity. Usually a stripe or something is painted on the wall to show moms that babies can't go past it

*karen* said...

As a senior in high school I worked at Old Navy and they introduced the Code Adam thing (named for the son of the America's Most Wanted guy)--maybe it's a different name than what they use at hospitals, but if someone came to us and said her kid was missing, we'd have to alert everyone on our headsets and a manager would prevent anyone from leaving the store.

The thing that I found stupid was that we'd have to do a Code Adam alert if we FOUND a kid. I guess in case the parents tried to leave them there?

SusanB said...

I worked in pediatrics. Code pink was the term for a missing child. Since it was a pediatric hospital, we didn't have neonates unless they were sick (we didn't deliver babies) so we had fewer instances of missing children than the average hospital. Usually a teen who wandered off or ran away.

rejectedcarebear said...

Oh goodness Mary! That is beyond terrifying, I'm so glad your daughter is fine! My niece made it as well, and with as loud as she squeals you'd never guess she had any lung troubles.

BFSkinnerchick said...

RCB & Mary, we lived your fears too. Our girl was 1 lb 14 oz, born at 25 wks. The lung issues were the worst. She was in respiratory distress so often in the 4 months we spent in the hospital. The codes and alarms never stopped being terrifying. They told us her lungs were like thin sheets of glass that could just shatter anytime. She's a vibrant, nearly 7-year-old now. Amazing!

Rose said...

Frequently, really?

Gtzisshe said...

when my son was born he had a faulty sensor. Nurses kept coming in and out of the room to check on us and at one point the nurse mentioned to me that they had a full code going because of his ankle sensor. They changed it out.
Thank goodness the baby is ok. If she wasn't going to be a helicopter mom then, she sure the hell is now.

lazyday603 said...

There is no better place to meet new people than a maternity ward.

LA Mac said...

I've never heard of these newborn sensors. I live in a pretty small town in Canada though. I imagine they have them here in the large cities. In our maternity ward the baby never leaves your side anyway, there is no nursery. If you want a shower, you wheel the bassinet in the bathroom with you, and they are all private rooms

discoflux said...

LOL @ lazyday!

Me said...

Well, the system works. Back in the day my kids hospital bracelets were regular hospital id bracelets. And they slid off pretty easily. So many weirdos.

dilettante said...

Maternity wards generally aren't very secure. So many non-patients are free to come in and out as visitors at all hours of the day and night. They can often roam the halls if they want. Many do, out of curiosity and also to go to the bathrooms or get drinks / snacks. And as a patient, you are alone mostly, in an unlocked room, perhaps sleeping or sedated, hooked up to IVs and morphine and whatever else. I had two c-sections and during each 5-day stay nothing happened, but I was a nervous wreck that someone would come in (of course post-delivery I wasn't at my most rational anyway). I barely slept. My kids were both in the ICU (they're totally fine now) and although that was so awful at the time, on the upside I knew they were in a very secure, locked ward. I really do think hospitals need to find a better way to keep out people who don't belong, and also to keep patients more protected / secure. Just in case, and also for peace of mind.

feraltart said...

As someone who has suffered infertility, I cannot understand stealing another person's child. The cruelty of the act is horrific. I feel this stems from a sense of entitlement that has permeated society. It used to be that people knew they couldn't always get what they wanted, now they expect to have everything they desire. I also agree with dilettante, hospitals need to be more secure.

Maria said...

My son just turned 3 and we had the baby lo jack at the hosptial. Of course, I did deliver a Cedars-Sinai so it was a pretty plush and secure experience.

Little Miss Smoke and Mirrors said...

My niece had one of those things at another So Cal hospital four years ago. They are like police anklets the likes of which Lohan had to wear. The parents can't take it off, it requires a key.

Ironically enough, the hospital where I work had a code pink (suspected child abduction) just today. I don't know what happened...

1Jazzimom said...

Lock her up, that mom had to be terrified and a baby in a handbag? Uggh!

lakeuniongirl said...

My husband works at our local children's hospital and there it's "Code Lindbergh". My second child (and all subsequent babies) had the baby lo-jack and this was in 1999.

lakeuniongirl said...

My husband works at our local children's hospital and there it's "Code Lindbergh". My second child (and all subsequent babies) had the baby lo-jack and this was in 1999.

lakeuniongirl said...

My husband works at our local children's hospital and there it's "Code Lindbergh". My second child (and all subsequent babies) had the baby lo-jack and this was in 1999.

lakeuniongirl said...

My husband works at our local children's hospital and there it's "Code Lindbergh". My second child (and all subsequent babies) had the baby lo-jack and this was in 1999.