Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Never Forget


As always, feel free to share your 9/11 feelings, or experiences or anything you wish to share.

162 comments:

Nutty_Flavor said...

Sad about the loss of life, sad about the symbolism, but I don't miss the buildings. I worked across the street and went through them every day on my way to the subway station. They were examples of the absolute worst of 70s architecture.

There used to be a nightclub at the top of one of the towers.

Nutty_Flavor said...

Trying to find the name of the nightclub - which was at the restaurant Windows of the World, where several employees died on September 11, 2001 - I found this cached version of the Windows of the World website from 2001. It's a step back in time.

http://web.archive.org/web/200102040137/http://windowsontheworld.com/wow/index.shtml

Roman Holiday said...

There are evil people in this world and this just proves that!!!
RIP to all the victims of this senseless tragedies:(

auntliddy said...

A horrible day that involved many family members. A horrible day.

Alita said...

I was on the other side of the world. Was dawn there. Heard about No1 on the radio, didn't believe they could be reporting correctly, assumed it was journalists being overly dramatic, went and turned the TV on. Watched - floored. Tried calling my NY brother, but the phones were jammed. Honestly, this far on, still floored. Maybe because I haven't been to ground zero - the whole tragedy is .. almost too bizzare and massive to consider.

Thoughts and love on this day to all.

goes in circles said...

Rest peacefully...

At the risk of sounding callous...
am I the only one who hates how inundated their fb newsfeed is with status about "where I was..."
Idgaf where YOU were, it wasn't about YOU.

goes in circles said...

Sorry Alita. :/

libby said...

It was one of the few days of my life, that the weather was so perfect, the sky so pretty, That I actually said, "Wow" as soon as I went outside.

It was a Tuesday, like today, and today's weather is similar too. I'm sad.

Our restaurant opened that night, and I had to wait tables. The few customers who showed up were somber except the one oblivious jackass of the century, who kept harassing me in front of his date for not smiling enough. All I could croak out was "Not today, sir. I'm sorry."
Can you believe that jerk? I could tell he was the type who complains at waitresses every time, because it makes him feel important and look like a big shot---but on 9/11? The man was a total jag-off. I felt sorry for his date. She looked uncomfortable too, and sad like the rest of us.

rejectedcarebear said...

My thoughts to all those affected. It was a horrifying day. I had just spent the month of August in DC with family, the place has never been the same.

Maximus said...

I hate today. I hate reliving today, I hate everyone reposting pictures today, I hate everything about it. I cannot get this day out of my mind, I feel I am constantly thinking about what changed and those we lost. I remember being there in DC for it, I remember trying to reach my uncle at the Towers frantically for hours, I remember my father giving up on reading the victim list because he kept recognizing names.
Ranting to the public, please forgive me.


I hate today. I will never forget today. I just wish I could sleep through it, though, because the repeated images can be overwhelming for those of us who always remember them.

It also was angering to go over the bridge this morning and see a half finished building looming into the sky. For god's sake - it should have been finished years ago.

goheels83 said...

I was in AP English and someone came running into our classroom and told us to turn on the tv. I watched both of the towers fall live on tv. I thought I was hallucinating when the first one fell, then we were all expecting the second one.

My thoughts and prayers are with all those affected by the tragedy.

Tuxedo Cat said...

I found out from my Usenet account alt.gossip.celebrities, which I read and posted on regularly.

One of the posters from New York announced that something terrible was happening but she/he wasn't quite sure what.

I sent my prayers as did many other posters.

goheels83 said...

@Maximus, I am so sorry. :(

Dementia said...

The name of the club was Wild Blue

Groovy said...

Jesus. Here we go. Every fucking year. It was an inside job. Why don't we have a moment of peace for the hundreds of thousands of people from Afghanistan who were innocently killed in a needless war? Or the thousands of Palestinians killed each day in name of genocide for Israel? This country is made up retarded sheep and all this fake patriotism this time of year SUCKS.

Audrey said...

Today's my father's birthday. At least now I can't help but remember the date.

Kewi said...

@Groovy- agreed but it was still a terrible day, nobody deserves to lose the people they love, nobody deserves to lose their life so carelessly at the hands of another.

nichole said...

@Maximus and Libby - I agree. I hate today, I hate being reminded. I relive those moments every year, every time I see a picture. I am still mad that the students in my residence halls lost parents, family, friends. Some of my students lost everything because their residence hall was next door to the towers. Only to have more students lose more family and friends when the plane crashed in Queens a few weeks later.

Today makes me mad and sad and I can't wait for it to be over.

I'm sad because as Libby noted, being Tuesday and gorgeous here in the northeast, it feels eerily familiar.

*karen* said...

I had just started my freshman year of college a couple weeks before and had just gotten back from an 8am class when a suitemate came across the hall to tell my roommate and I that "someone bombed the World Trade Center" because we didn't know yet that it was a plane. We watched everything else.

When we found out about the Pentagon, I started trying to call my family (everyone lives just a few miles out of DC like I do now). I knew that they weren't at the Pentagon, but we didn't know if there would be another attack.

At the one class that wasn't canceled that day, my professor asked what we thought would happen. I blurted out that I thought there would be war and she looked at me like I was an absolute idiot for thinking that, as if I WANTED there to be war.

good 'ol me said...

I am sorry for the victims and their families. Who can forget those images? :-( and OMG those phone calls, messages, etc. Surreal and so violent. I heard many years later that someone I knew survived this. (I am not from the area, so it was really odd).

Even though Groovy is totally correct.

MISCH said...

A day I will never forget, my friend was 8 months pregnant with her first child and lost her husband. So many lost, so many children who will never know a parent.
Glad they have finally expanded the aid for 911 related health issues. Anyone who lived in downtown New York on that day and the weeks to come, can tell you about the air, the smell, the taste, the first responders deserve the best health care possible.
Today my prayers are for them.

Lisa B. said...
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Alita said...

That's okay, I get what you mean. I'm not american, so it just isn't the same; in fact it (anniversary) isn't even in the news here. Tbh this is the first time I have ever written that (my memories) down; I appreciate that it's got to be quite different if you have major overload.

Get what you say, stand by what I wrote .. and you know you could have skipped the post, what else was it going to be :o)

goheels83 said...

I also will never forget the videos of people waving shirts from the windows and then eventually jumping from the towers. Those images will stay with me forever.

shauniebear said...

I was eight months pregnant with my daughter, and I was eating fried chicken for breakfast. I remember turning on the tv just as the first plane hit. I got so upset that I choked on the chicken to the point that I almost passed out, and went into labor. I watched tv all through my labor and cried. At the end of a terrible day, I was blessed with my miracle daughter...

Dementia said...

There is an appalling piece in the NYT editorial section this morning that the CIA was pleading with GW ALL SUMMER to do something - anything - to avoid this attack. If that is true he and his neocon friends ought to be in jail.

Lalaay said...

^^ This! I couldn't have said it better!!

Frufra said...

Oh, shaunie, I was eight months pregnant, too. I was on bed rest any way, and cannot believe the stress of that day didn't cause me to go into labor, too. So glad to hear that your daughter was born healthy, though. Your story just struck quite a chord with me.

I saw the news in between videos I was watching with my 2 1/2 year old, who insisted on getting up at 6 am every day. I survived only by letting him watch Thomas the Tank Engine on my lap while I slept :-).

Nutty_Flavor said...

OMG, here we go with the political firestorms again. Suffice to say that if Bill Clinton had killed Osama Bin Laden when he had the chance in the 1990s, history would have been very different.

shauniebear said...

@Frufra- so glad our littles turned out healthy and happy :) My daughter doesn't like celebrating her birthday at school to this day because it's a somber atmosphere at school (understandably).

libby said...

You should read the article, Nutty, if you haven't. It's not much more than what we knew already, just a clearer picture of how badly the warnings were ignored.

I don't think it's political, I think we learn from it.

EmEyeKay said...

Co-sign @Maximus.

goes in circles said...

Alita
I could have. :)
I was irritated by certain fb friend's statuses. I understand people grieve and remember in different ways, and one of them is well, remembering how they felt, which is associated with what they were doing at the time.
Of course I think about it in the same way, but it just seemed to me some people were being so dramatic and selfish. It struck a nerve.
Nobody here is doing that, including you.

I am a US citizen and have been and have lived here since I was a child, but I was born in Norway and spent many, many very influential years in Canada. I consider myself American, but sometimes the difference in between US and those countries is startling when it comes to things like this. I hope that makes sense and that I have not offended anyone. :)

Where I was: working at a day treatment center for the mentally ill. The client I had immediately after we heard was only worried that her flight to Arizona might be cancelled. Being that she had a mental illness that distorted her perceptions of reality I had to do my job

goes in circles said...

and understand why she was being so incredibly selfish and self absorbed. The while all I wanted to do was go home, cry, watch tv with my family all day.

goes in circles said...

True that.

Dementia said...

Nutty - political firestorm not intended. I asked my Mom once why she was voting for such a stupid man. She said he would have smart people around him and all would go well. She was wrong.

Maja. With a J. said...

@ Groovy - not that I disagree with you, but I think we can talk about those things during the rest of the year. Let people grieve today.

I went down to Ground Zero when I visited NYC last year. We weren't gonna go (I kind of feel like a circling vulture when I seek out places of tragedy), but we found ourselves in the area so we walked down there. It was so quiet, even with the construction going on, and it felt like it was several degrees colder than the rest of Manhattan that day. Weird.

bobbi_1025 said...

My daughter was 14 months old and started screaming "Plane, Plane!" at the top of her lungs. I went to go get onto her cause we lived in a tiny apt and realized what she was looking at. Couldn't believe it at first. I woke my husband up even though he had pulled a double at the jail to show him.

On the first anniversary I was working at the sheriffs office and had to handwrite the name of every police officer on an index card to be read by each of our officers. It was a real depressing thing to have to do thinking about how that was only the police, which was just a fraction of the lives lost.

ReesesPeace said...

I was living in Ann Arbor; it was my day off and I was traumatized by a violent break-in at home on the 8th. I was listening to U2's *Walk On* over and over. My boyfriend called and told me to turn on the tv. What channel. Any. Doesn't matter. I curled up on my couch with my kitties and cried.

I worked as a cashier and the next day at work was unreal. The Islamic Center was located right in front of my apartment, just down the street from my store. Most of the people in my building were Muslim. A couple had been helping me out after the assault: food and stuff. You know how people are. So. At work, I was shocked and angry that my coworkers were being assholes to our Muslim customers. Turning off their lights and walking away. Mgmt did nothing until me and a couple people got very vocal.

I so wish we didn't have to relive this over and over. But, it's our generations JFK Where were you moment. I think it gives people a sort of comfort to talk about it. Don't blast on people if they need that. Just move on.

kelgela said...

I always remember how our teacher didn't bother telling us and I found out after school when I got home.

This day is one of those days I would like to skip.

And I agree with the FB update thing. I was going to write one of those, but decided against it.

I try to avoid seeing those images as much as possible because every time I do, I just feel so helpless and sad.

Me said...

i have almost started crying several times today. no personal connection, but its overwhelming to think of what 9/11 was and what it means.

dia papaya said...

My thoughts and prayers go out to everyone today. It is a day of mourning for all we lost so many years ago. Not just human lives, but a whole way of being. However, it is also a day of hope and the triumph of human spirit. So many heroes that day.

I am a Washingtonian. I was born and raised in DC, and though I don't live there any more I did then. Most of us had just arrived to work and we all watched huddled together in the lounge. It was heartbreaking. My BF flew a lot for work back then and just happened to not be on a plane that day (usually Dulles) and not in New York.

I didn't lose anyone personally, but that doesn't matter. We all lost that day. The world is a very different place. So on this day of memorial, I want to honor everyone who died or lost someone they loved. Sending you all big virtual hugs.

rhinovodka said...

I will never forget what a quiet night it was. I was fortunate, I did not lose anyone. I am sorry for those that did, may everyone find peace on this day.

ReesesPeace said...

@Dia, your last sentence: exactly!

Hugs and love to you all. I'm fairly new here (April) and don't comment all that often, but I just love the hell out of you guys! <3

katsm0711 said...

We live in the greatest country in the world and nobody can ever take that from us.

kelgela said...

I'm watching them read the names right now. It's so sad I'm crying.

Chilie said...

So many of the first responders are sick, dying or dead. I'm glad the authorities have finally admitted / recognized that the cancers striking the first responders is a direct result of the toxic substances they were exposed to when they showed up to help others.

LeGrange said...

Terrible event. Dont know why but everytime Free Bird plays I think of 9/11. Maybe I was hearing it when it happend or afterwards... Anyways, its perfect!

Hope they are all in peace!

katsm0711 said...

I live an hour from NYC so it's common for people to live here and commute. Only one person in my actual town was working in the towers. The worst to me, is in the town next to me, the parents and their two young children were on a plane. All I can think about is the grandparents who also live in the town having to clean out the empty house. It's killing me watching the names being read and seeing barely teenagers reading the names and knowing that they have no memories or weren't even born to remember the loved one that was stolen from them. My cousin was visiting and we went to a bar that night blasting Slayers South of Heaven.

Seachica said...

I'm trying very hard not to go ballistic on people who think it's hypocritical to be mournful on 9/11. I'll just let my new profile image do the talking. I'll never forget.

crila16 said...

The weather was amazing that day. It wasn't far off from how it is today...ironically, also a Tuesday exactly 11 years ago. I remember how beautiful it was outside. It was in the low 70's...not one single cloud in the sky. Today was a little cooler...but the blue sky was similar.

@Seachica...I'm in 100% agreement with you. I lost my boyfriend on that day. I will never forget. When you are part of something so traumatic, it never leaves your mind. For those who feel it's time to forget, it's plain old ignorance and lack of sympathy for those who lived through it and watched as a city collapsed. Sitting on the subway with millions of people, walking down the street filled with millions of people...but yet the silence was deafening. You will never let that go. Watching the towers come crashing to the ground. Thinking about it brings tears to my eyes.

libby said...

Seachica--RIGHT ON! From a fellow patriot.

And crila--I had NO idea you lost your BF that day. I am so so sorry for your loss.

JoElla said...

Just hugs for everyone.

Today is such a hard day for everyone.

Lets just be kind to one and other.

lostathome said...

I was a freshman in Highschool and remember being in home room and they told us to turn the tv on. I don't think we studied anything that day.

I wasn't there, but the thought of all the pain and chaos that was going on at ground zero that day still crosses my mind frequently. The people jumping out of the buildings. The ones on the top floor who had no choice but to die.

I also think about how many ppl actually survived but died in the following days from being buried alive. And for months how there were still fires and smoke in the area. I even heard that from blocks away body parts were scattered. I don't know how true that last part is, but that must have been awful.

I tend to agree nowadays that it was an inside job, just looking at the way the towers collapsed and reading articles. But either way, it supposed to be about remembering the innocent which is what I plan to do.

I don't mind the Facebook posts so much, the part that gets me is "never forget", which to me means it is something someone thinks of on a regular basis. Most people have long stopped doing that.

I too think the first responders should be well taken care of, but all these assholes are worried about is their campaign and not the stuff that matters. Anyway...


Has anyone heard about Ground Zero being hauted or anything?

Del Riser said...

A heartwrenching day for the many who lost loved ones, friends and fellow workers.

I wish you all peace and better memories in the future.

Cara said...

I think the thing that I'll always remember is that pretty much every single TV channel either stopped broadcasting or picked up a feed from a news channel. I'd never seen that happen before, and I've never seen it happen since. For some reason, that's when the absolute hugeness of what happened hit me.

I will never fully comprehend what happened that day; I cannot even begin to imagine what it was like to have been in NYC, or in Washington DC, or to have known someone that was on those flights. My heart aches for all those involved; for what you've lost, for what you'll go through for the rest of your life. What makes me saddest, though, is how this tragedy is used to advance political agendas, supress individual freedoms and right to privacy, and as justification for blatant racism and hatred. There's a difference between honoring the dead and the sacrifices made and using those sacrifices to your advantage.

Let's just stop and be at peace with each other, just for one day. Hug your kids/spouse/friends/mom/dog and tell them you love them, because we are all on borrowed time, and what is life without love?

xoxoxox to all <3

Dianne P said...

Eleven years later, I am still sad, even though I didn't know anyone who was killed in the attacks. And if I'm still sad and shocked, I can only imagine how people whose lives were more directly affected must feel.

I hate the way we have accepted so many appalling things as 'normal' as a result of the 9/11 attacks. So yes, today (and everyday), remember to tell the important people in your life how you feel about them, and pray, meditate, or whatever you do for peace if you are so moved.

loubea said...

I was pregnant and my boss made us work late on something that could have waited. I was the last to pick up my older child at daycare. The workers there thought I was a monster for it. Looking back I wish I would have told my boss to fuck off and sent my department home. I was younger then and still trying to please. Hugs to everyone today.

whocaresnow12 said...

My friend and his partner and their newly adopted son wereon the second plane that went into the towers. I refuse to watch TV or read the news ever 9/11. I don't think people understand the torture that is watching someone you love die over and over again every year when they show that footage. They don't show any other footage as much as they do the second plane flying into the towers. I think we can remember without showing that over and over and over again.

TinselSass said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Himmmm said...

MY LOVE AND HONOR goes to the souls of those victims. MY RESPECT to the families of everyone who perished that day - those innocent victims of pure evil. Thank you for your strength and standing as a noble example of dignity. May your beloved rest in peace, and may you find endless power, love, and healing.

THANK YOU to those selfless brave heroes who willingly ran into the destruction at WTC to save others. May God bring peace to the lives of the survivors and families.

THANK YOU to the heroes who have fought, died, or were injured in our armed forces to keep us from suffering another crippling blow. Including the legendary JSOC Operators who took out Bin Laden. May the circle be now complete. And to all their families and friends who carry the weight for them, and for the rest of us, my gratitude eternally.

THANK YOU to the amazing heroes aboard that jet in Pennsylvania, and to their families whom I pray know what true heroes they are and how much we are indebted to them.

THANK YOU to every soldier, firefighter, cop, EMT, nurse, prosecutor and every one of their associates and families who do this stuff EVERY SINGLE DAY so we can live our vain and shallow lives without having to quake in fear daily at the thought of another attack. Thank you for sewing the blanket of freedom covering us.

To all of my friends, family, and bretheren all over the world - please never forget this day, the sacrifices, or those who protect us daily.
NEVER...EVER...FORGET.
GOD BLESS YOU ALL!
GOD BLESS AMERICA!!

TinselSass said...

@Nutty_Flavor - thank you for the Windows on the World link. Years earlier, we celebrated my Uncle's 60th birthday with a dinner party in that restaurant. Although I was just 16, I remember the elevator ride took forever (actually, the building was so high, you had to switch on one floor and take a second elevator to the top). The restaurant bathroom was the most glamorous EVER. My Uncle died in 1999 (so glad he didn't experience the horror of 9/11/2001... he was born and raised in New York and loved his city to his core). And for me, eleven years later, 9/11 remains a black hole of sadness.

Thanks to all of you for the daily doses of joy and humanity. I don't get to post often but I appreciate that many of you do. BEST ALWAYS!

MelTheLibrarian said...

I was 13 and brushing my teeth when my parents start screaming that a plane had hit the towers. I ran to the living room and watched just as the second plane hit. I remember being so angry that anyone could ever harbor so much hate for a people and country. I kept wishing that I could be 18 because I would have instantly joined the military and fought to preserve the freedom we have always fought to maintain in this country. My husband is in the Marines and everyday I am thankful for him and for all other military members who are far braver than most of us. I will never forget the images I saw that day, nor the many innocent people that were lost and have been lost since.

smashbash said...

Shaunie- bless your sweet baby and give her/him a little squeeze for us. That baby is the future. Even as we look in the past.

Groovy- thank you for having the balls to say that.

Freshman in highschool. I was listening to Howard Stern, back when he only was on radio, he said a plane went into the pentagon. I ran down stairs and told my parents who turned on the tv. I went to school and walked into my Italian class. My teacher was an immigrant who lived in New York for much of his youth. He left the room to throw up. I will never ever forget that day.

I also think out government let this happen without intervening. We have an airforce especially for incidents like this and they weren't called until 7 minutes after the plane hit the towers. It is sad, disturbing, sickening and wrong. I am sorry to those who don't agree with this. It is only my opinion and means nothing.

old ;ady said...

My husband had left the TV on in the kitchen and I walked in and saw a plane hit the 2nd tower. I thought at first it was a movie. I turned up the sound and just stood there.

Live in a very small town. Later, I had to go to the other side of town and take care of some Dogs. It was so quiet, people standing in groups talking. When I got to my friends house to take care of her Dogs, the whole neighborhood was in the street talking.

Even in small town there were losses. Within, 2-3 days, everyone knew about 4 people who had lost relatives and some that had made it out.

The quiet was strange, but comforting. On the other hand we had gas stations who raised the price of gas to over $5. a gallon.

My step grandson was killed in Iraq on 6/6/11. He was a medic who needed money for college.

smashbash said...

Also. My father took a train to New York soon after the attack, all the way from San Diego. He helped clean up debris and other things I don't want to say. My dad is not the most loving person but this one act of selflessness made me really proud of him. He stayed for almost 2 months, he now has lung problems but moving to a dry climate (Arizona) has helped tremendously.

Maggie Casey said...

I was 14 on 9/11, and even though I knew something really bad happened, I didn't really grasp the situation. A few months ago, I was really bored and was listening to random stuff on youtube, when I came across Howard Stern's live broadcast of 9/11. wow. It was so interesting to hear and listen to what they were thinking as it was happening. So sad and terrifying. To all of you who lived in NY on 9/11 or who lost people, I'm so sorry for your loss.

MelTheLibrarian said...

@Old ;ady: I am so very sorry to hear about your grandson. It's hard to see so many young lives lost. My heart goes out to you and your family. I hope that you never feel that his life was lost in vain because there are soo many people in this world who are thankful to all the men and women who put on a uniform everyday and risk their life for total strangers.

smashbash said...

Old;ady- I am so sorry about your step grandson. My brother served 2 tours in Iraq and 1 in Afganistan. Everytime he leaves I am scared and cry.

SusanB said...

If you're interested, like Maggie Casey, in what people were thinking as it happened, MSNBC usually runs a tape of their 9/11/01 Today show on MSNBC in real time as it happened, from about 8:30 or so until noon. I watched it this morning and was struck by how much we know now that we didn't know then. On that day, I was at work in an orthopedic clinic and there was no TV so I have always found this tape fascinating.

One thing I find interesting about this day (and I mean absolutely NO disrespect to any of the victims or their families) is how people responded on this day professionally. I've read a lot of accounts by firefighters, police, air traffic people, health care workers, etc. I've often wondered how I would have responded had I been in their shoes. Their minute-by-minute stories are fascinating.

michelelala said...

I was at work, in a hospital operating room. I was out in the pre-op area full of families with small tv's in each bay. Literally, the room went silent as the second tower was hit; even the small children who had no comprehension of what was happening; just absorbing the feel from their parents. My hospital was put on alert, many rescheduled their surgeries. All you could hear was the phones, no one was talking; no usual hospital hustle and bustle. Very hushed. I got a call from the federal disaster team that I used to be a member of, telling me to get ready to go up to New York in 2 hours. I never got the confirmation call. I think that's what bothered me the most. That there was no one to take care of.

Sorry for the length- thanks for listening.

BettorOffSingle said...

How nice to see those who linked to a hate website about me that claims the "Jews did 9/11" are pretending to be loving and compassionate. Lincoln said something about fooling all of the people all of the time...

On 9/11/01, I had awoken around 8:50 a.m., as I had a long day planned. I was going to take the train from Philadelphia to the WTC itself to file an employment-discrimination complaint against a Wall Street firm. Over 100 women had sued the firm for "sexual harassment" and I decided I would "piggyback" the lawsuit by claiming that the harassment against women on the job equated to "romantic favoritism" against men in the interview process. The same doctrine can be used by ugly women, though most courts frown on it, since many judges bang their clerks, etc. Either way, I was going to make my case.

I awoke to the sight of a jet sticking outside of the WTC and thought "Okay, I'm not going to NYC today." Thought it was an accident and it would be a mess. The discrimination complaint was very important to me. I thought to myself that it was about time that men like me -- the child of a single-mother who owned the largest tape-transcription service in Manhattan, before she lost everything to an abuser, including my rent-stabilized luxury apartment, and the money to finish my 4.0 GPA.

I was as qualified a secretary as any bimbo ever escorted into those corner offices reserved for sexual misconduct. The women seemed resigned to going along, as they needed their paycheck; the bosses needed the sex, on company money. The only one really harmed was me, and no one cared about male secretaries, even as they claimed discrimination was horrible. They meant discrimination AGAINST WOMEN. Either way, I was still going to file.

For years, I had heard that people fight evil and do the right thing, plus that it was also right to stand up against sexual harassment. It's easy to talk about breaking gender barriers, but the reality leaves me a traitor to men, and an invader into "women's work."

One night, in 1997, I was in the AOL investment chat room, figuring "if only they knew." I outlined my injustice, with the caveat that the people who screwed me over would one day bankrupt America.

One man who had "invested" millions in a woman he was sponsoring in business threatened to kill me, saying I wouldn't know what hit me. The woman said I should go kill myself, while others said I didn't deserve to work in the WTC because of my attitude. The verbal abuse was nonstop, and I just sat there, bearing witness.

I said one thing in response:

"If you ever have a tragedy, or an injustice, would you like me to mock it the way you are donig to me?"

They said:

"BRING IT ON!! I'm too SMART to ever LET that happen."

They DID say to bring it on, so I did. I have no sympathy for the 9/11 victims, since they were the ones who either violated my civil rights, or stood down while others did so. They thought death was fine for me, but apparently not for their chosen ones; too bad, God seems to want me around. I noted that too.

Sweetest of all, however, was knowing that I would have died in that attack but for the discrimination that kept me away from my office desk.

As I've said, "an office whore died in my place." A woman hired for her looks, hit on by a creeper boss, and working for the one-percenters who would bankrupt America. Of course, back then "they" were the 99 percent, because Hitler hadn't yet come for them.

While the 9/11 attack was tragic, the people who died in there (except for the first responders of course) were human garbage, addition to this world by their subtraction from it, people who TOLD me to "bring it on" if they ever had a tragedy.

BettorOffSingle said...

(continued)

To the children of the victims, I ask why I should cry for you losing your parents when your parents destroyed my resume and salary, and laughed as if it were righteous? My blood is on the money they used to spoil you, but only after Daddy spends his big money on his secretary, because, well, she's prettier than your mommy.

Yes, I'm GLAD your paernts died if they worked in the WTC for a financial firm. They took my jobs and told me to go kill myself. Turnabout is, after all, fair play.

To those who say I did not DESERVE to be working in the WTC on 9/11, due to my attitude, I say only now that I couldn't agree more.

Just as you laughed at my tragedy, at my injustice, at the MURDER of children I could not afford to have, I now laugh at yours.

HA HA HA

I also pity those who think threatening, harassing (or linking to those who harass), or lying about me is somehow justified because you don't like what I say about people who violated my civil rights.

Too bad, my conscience is clear. God will side with me here, and I know that eats all of you alive.

May every last victim who worked in the WTC, who would not have hired me, or who would even associate with those who violated my rights (i.e., anyone who hires secretaries or knows people who do), just hear my laughter as you picture me dancing on your graves.

Like you once said to me, you DESERVED it.

lucy said...

I've never been to NYC and I do not know any of the victims. I cannot possibly understand how difficult today (and each day since the tragedy) is for their families, co-workers, and fellow New Yorkers. Still, it is a sad day to remember and my heart aches for everyone involved.

I was living in suburban Detroit, working at job I hated so much it made me physically ill to walk into the building. On September 12th I gave notice and moved to Chicago. I met my husband a year later, we bought a house, I'm self employed, and we're trying to start a family. While I wish September 11, 2001 never happened, I will forever be indebted to its victims for showing me how precious life is and reminding me to live. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Sarah said...

Like everyone else, that day left its firm imprint on my heart and mind. I'll never forget where I was, what I was doing.
That day the American dream died with our countrymen.

ReacherB said...

I was at Windows on the World 3 days before this happened, and we constantly said to eachother, as the buildings slightly swayed, how we could never imaging working this high up, where even the helicopters fly below you. My husband was one of those people running from that big billow of smoke, since he went to check out what was happening after the courts closed, I didn't hear from him for hours, and I just remember so vividly the masses of people walking home from downtowm, trying to get over the bridges etc. covered in dut, no one said a word, it was like day of the dead. then the smell of acrid smoke as the towers burned for day...SIGH! Changed life as we know it here in NYC

Thomas said...

I've got conflicted feelings about it. People die every day, and just under 3000 people dying is, in the grand scheme of things, a drop in the bucket. What got everyone's attention was the destruction of the buildings, I think. I don't like the way it's all been fetish-ized and "The Towers" made into this symbol of...SOMETHING...when it's the people who should be thought of, if at all. At the time, it was far scarier for me that the freaking Pentagon had been attacked. But back to the WTC: it was a tragedy, but tragedies happen every day. Usually, they happen to "someone else". This time, it "happened" to all of us. I also remember how, yes, the media was really milking it (as if it even NEEDED milking.) Where I was living at the time, I was listening to the local Public Radio / NPR affiliate, and between live feeds, they were playing this...really SCARY, ominous instrumental music. I kept thinking "boy, this sounds really goddamned familiar". I finally figured it out: they were playing soundtrack music from "Silence of the Lambs". WTF??? Anyway, I spent the afternoon 9/11 playing Canasta and eating McDonald's cheeseburgers with a girl I worked with: we sat around being jaded and cynical about it all...

pilly said...

It's still a shock to the system.

whocaresnow12 said...

BetterOffSingle- you're a disgusting, pathetic excuse for a human being. I hope you get help for your issues.

VIPblonde said...

@Dementia - that news has been out for years. Good on the NY Times for reminding people. People still don't talk about the fact that Bush is a war criminal, and he'll never be prosecuted for it either. Mini-political rant over

Seachica said...

Beautifully said, Hmmm

Cara said...

@BetterOffSingle - while I usually appreciate a well-placed, slightly inappropriate bit of humor, you'd be well served to, for lack of a better term, keep your fucking mouth shut and have some respect.

I'm 99% sure that you're trolling, but the fact that you took all that time to type it out to shit on what was a civil discussion says volumes about the type of person you are, whether you believe the things you type or not.

Cara said...

Typo - should say "the fact you took all that time to shit on"....

carry on. *hugs* to all.

Ari said...

the rest of the country does not feel it as much as us NYers...we'll never forget where we were and what we were doing the minute we heard what happened...we lost a lot of amazing people one day, i hope they are watching over their friends and families

yodelay said...

I don't think I could accurately send my feelings about that day out one the "internets" but...

I'm on the west coast, so I woke up to the news on the radio just before the second impact. I drug myself out of bed and turned on the TV, fillled dread. I knew I HAD to watch, as an American, because my country was under attack. I remember my mother calling so we could watch it "together". What I really recall of that day is the feelings of horror, disbelief, confusion, and sorrow that we shared.

I do remember choking up the first time I saw a fire engine after that day; maybe the first few times.

And maybe I panicked a little in downtown San Diego when I saw a plane going low for a landing. If any of you are familiar with that airport, you know what I mean.

Kewi said...

You're still bitter after all these years? Untuck your penis and grow the fuck up. It should've motivated you to be better and give 110% instead of making a fuss over something that will never chance. Those people would've had to face judgment sooner or later for doing you wrong and others, but it's just as wrong for you to carry the attitude of being entitled. Life sucks and it is never fair, tbh you and Miss Lohan would make a lovely couple.

yodelay said...

I couldn't agree more. That was beautiful himmmm

Kewi said...

*change

Angelina said...

I covered the 10th anniversary last year in NYC ( I am a journalist). After one week of talking to first responders, families of the victims, and attending the ceremony, I had to take a few days off and stare at the wall. Some families said that the 10th turned a page and they wouldn't be back. Others said they would come every year until they died. Two different responses to grief, but mourning all the same. The one woman who made "me cry lost her brother. She said, My brother was a proud black man. And I am so sad that he didn't live to see a black man in the white house." I had a good cry after that one.

libby said...

Thank you Himmmm, beautifully written.

Amen to Kewi.

And yodelay--The SD airport IS a nail-biter. It's convenient that it's practically downtown and all--but I've flown in & out of there, and it IS scary!

(LOVE SD, btw.)

Just Browsing said...

Another thank you to Himmmm......so poignantly written.

E Gee Be said...

Every thing about this day provokes a visceral response; chills, tears, an overwhelming feeling of loss and sadness for those among us that lost someone that day. Peace to all here.

Sherry said...

I was listening to the radio and they announced the first plane had flown into the tower. I grabbed my husband (boyfriend at the time) and turned on the TV. He said I told him the bldg was going to collapse but I don't remember saying it. I was just in shock. I had just started in corporate travel sales and it was a BAD day at the office as we tried to track down people who were booked on those flights. What do you tell a family member asking about a booking? Also had been a flight attendant for UAL and worried about my friends flying that day. Was just shocked that anyone would go into those bldgs to save people. They were all heros. Called friends in NYC where I previously lived and couldn't get through but did not lose any friends. I cannot express enough sorrow for any of you who did. It was the worst tragedy that ever happened on US soil and I thank our military men and women who defend us.
Crackie...You needs to go the hell away. NEVER reproduce. You have serious mental issues. Serious!

smashbash said...

Himmmm put it best. That is how a MAN responds. With class, dignity and honor.

gtzisshe said...

Why do I get the feeling that you are on the level of James Holmes and Jeffrey Johnson?

Call me yndy... said...

I had seen so many things in life that let me know just how much "safety" from insanity or hatred is an illusion. So the impact the day of was not nearly so shocking to me. I went to work after watching it happen live (had the TV on getting ready) and spent my day counseling those students who did show up before the U closed the school for the day.

The tears didn't really come until last year. When I realized 10 years later what had happened to the country - the loss of civil rights, the omnipresent fear, the wars and economic collapse... I cried with ugly sobs.

My heart always goes with those who died - during the attacks or since (as a result of them) - and their loved ones and families - no matter their nationality, creed, or other. It was a tragedy and still is.

Call me yndy... said...

Oh and @bettor if you are trying to troll? That was lame and obvious. If you aren't trying? You really need help.

goes in circles said...

Unfortunately I think @betteroff is not being funny. he's mentioned several times in the past his hate for "WTC whores"
I am afraid he has some serious mental deficits and it would be in everyone's best interest to ignore him.

IDoTheRobot said...

I was in Spanish I in high school. My future husband was 3 seats behind me. The world stopped that day.

God Bless everyone and love to those that have lost. My deepest apologies.

Agent**It said...

“All that's necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.”

Edmund Burke

M said...

Don't feed the trolls.

SCat07 said...

I worked at 2 WTC, 95th Fl. Was supposed to be there @8:30am but woke-up late & got there right after the 2nd plane hit.

Words don't properly describe the sheer terror of that day. I have images burned into my head that I will never be able to erase. I was lucky in that I didn't see anyone jumping, but just to see those beautiful, magnificent towers on fire like that, hearing a loud bang (& grown men crying & screaming) & then looking up to see my tower pancake down into plumes of smoke - I couldn't stop shaking from the trauma for weeks after 9/11. NYC was like a war zone, I've never seen anything in my life like this.

So my company lost about 90 people that day. Every year, on the anniversary, we'd mourn & weep together & bonded over this over the years. I am at a different job now, but the friendships I made at my last job make them like a special family to me.

I take off from work every anniversary. I spend it privately at home just watching the coverage on TV of the ceremony & the various documentaries about 9/11. I know it sounds like I'm torturing myself, but in a way, this is how I deal with the grief of so many people dying that day ... & in a selfish way, knowing that I almost died that day myself. It changed my life completely in that it was a wake-up call to live my life more fully.

Hubbel Gardner said...

Apparently NBC forgot... and gave us Kris "I've made a career out of whoring my daughter" Kardashian instead of a respectful moment of silence this morning... nauseating...

deree said...

None of us know for sure what really happened. I've never been entirely on board with "the official story".The bigger picture is thousands of lives were lost and people continue to die in the name of greed and war.This is not ok!

What both bothers me and makes me feel lucky all at the same time is the fact 9/11 is such a huge deal to us as Americans. It bothers me because other countries face terrorism and loss of life daily. This is a tremendously tragic and sad event for America but we are so spoiled it was just one horrible day.

It humbles me because I realize how blessed we are that this one event hit us harder than most because we do not live with war right outside our back doors.

Roman Holiday said...

@Scat07 you should consider yourself lucky! Your story just made me sad all over again!

@Better you should really seek help for your bitterness! Life is unfair! Deal with it!

bobbi_1025 said...

I think somebody has been sipping the koolaid

smashbash said...

Scat07 thank you for sharing your story with us.

dia papaya said...

@crila16, @whocaresnow12, @SCat07 - Thank you all for sharing your stories. I am crying reading them. I will toast to your loved ones and friends tonight!

@Reeses - Thanks for the thumbs up and your comments yesterday!

I think Himmmm already said everything I was thinking. You never really know how you will respond in that kind of situation. Look at how we all came together in the aftermath. I wish some of that goodwill and togetherness remainded.

Let's focus on the things that make us a better nation, better friends, better family members. I don't want all those beautiful lives to go to waste as we continue to argue over the mundane.

Lastly, lets continue to support the first responders and make sure they are getting the care they need.

Lissette said...

Thank you, Himmmm. I couldn't have said it better myself.

Cara said...

@SCat07, and everyone else who was personally affected by this tragedy - sincere *hugs*. Thank you for sharing, and know that we all wish we could do something to make your burden a little lighter.

TinselSass said...

Yes, thanks to @crila16, @whocaresnow12, @SCat07 for sharing your memories. Sending you all good thoughts and strength.

Thanks to @dia papaya and Himmmmm for always adding insight and clarity... you are lights.

And if you didn't hear Vice President Biden's tribute today in Shanksville to the heroes of Flight 93, the text is worth reading:

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/biden-delivers-tender-personal-tribute-9-11-victims-180436821--election.html

Lissette said...

I know of people who lost loved ones that day. My brother was on his way to drop off documents (he is an immigration attorney). He was late. Stepping out from the subway to go into WTC someone yanked him back in. Saved his life. He says he never forgot seeing faces of people as the train went back in reverse. People outside. Took hours to reach him but grateful.

As for idiot troll, don't feed it.

jax said...

Betteroffsingle...go fuck yourself with your tiny minute penis you fucking POOR excuse for a MAN.

there, now you got the attention you so DESPERATELY need to breathe you fucktard.now go jerk your tiny c-ck at the thought of pissing someone off on 9/11. YOU'RE WELCOME.

LA Mac said...

I was in senior year of high school. I remember walking into school getting back from lunch and my friend grabbed me and said "they are bombing the world trade centres!". I thought he was joking. They had two tv's set up in a big room and we went in to watch. We were allowed to skip class and go watch if we wanted. It struck me how few people were there, mostly teachers. As a Canadian, it is not the same as for a lot of you, but my heart breaks all over again every year

Tru Leigh said...

There was a contest to find the country's worst boss. The winner that year was a woman that worked for a dentist in NYC, this dentist was a millionaire. On 9/11, all the patients that day cancelled their appointments, understandably. The dentist was so mad, he docked everyone's pay $100.

Maybe worse than the jag-off restaurant customer.

csproat said...

I volunteered today....clearing trails at a camp for city kids.....
On my way home I stopped at the drug store and sat bawling in the parking lot when I remembered it was 9/11 again.

yvie said...

Well said jax, he is utterly disgusting and needs to remember karma is a very cruel mistress.... and he will get his

Sadie Goes Electric said...

ugh it was about YOU and about ME and everyone who lived to tell... and the brave who died.... we are all one and life is interconnected and we all were effected. I am just so over people wanting to tell others what to post or how to post lets just allow others to share without jumping down thier throats. This site was fun three years ago lets make it respectful again.

SCat07 said...

@smashbash, @dia papaya, @Cara: Thanks, guys.

I have to say though, the WTC was such a great place to work. I still remember a lot about the experience. I hope it's ok if I share a few memories of this, like:

- how it took 2 elevators to get to my floor (being herded like cattle into a huge elevator from 1-78th Fl/Sky Lobby, then transfer to smaller elevator to the 95th Fl)
- how quiet the city was from so high up. You couldn't hear a sound! It was especially beautiful at night.
- the bar in the Marriott hotel that was between the 2 towers (I think it was called Two Ships) that served awesome sangria
- the Promenade in between the towers (w/the fountain w/the golden spere/orb) where people would sit & have lunch
- locations of the stores in the Shopping Concourse: Banana Republic was across from J. Crew, which was near the big Borders store & a Duane Reade pharmacy & a photo store. E train/subway entrance was by the Nine West store, near which was a walkway that led to more stores like Lenscrafters & Sam Goody music store. Outside the towers, there was an HSBC bank & a big Borders store in 5 WTC. Also a Cosi sandwich shop on the opposide side.
- the small outpost of the Amish Market that was located on the 97th or 98th Fl (I forget which of the 2), it was a tiny room with 1 guy working the register (who was usually falling asleep from boredom as sometimes business was slow) - I always wondered if this guy made it out of the tower or not, I didn't know his name
- co-workers have told me that the buildings would sway on windy days, but I never felt it
- having to descend 3-4 flights of stairs deep into the depths of the basement of the South Tower (where the security offices were) to get my WTC ID badge made when I 1st joined the company

Hope everyone was ok today, especially those who were also affected. I have to say that 1 positive thing that's happened is that I've traveled more, become more brave about trying things in life that I didn't have the courage to do before 9/11 (Although, I did go through a period of my life where I was basically a functioning alcoholic, but it passed).

Never forget ...

Sunny said...

@SCat07
I am so grateful you shared your stories with us today. Like many, I have been crying much of the day. This day in particular always breaks my heart, but I also received a couple of pieces of lousy news today which isn't helping.
Reading your posts today really uplifted me - thanks for that :)

smashbash said...

Sunny- I hope you have a better day sweet lady.

Thank you again scat07- I wish I could have gone before they came down. Do you think it is a good thing to put new buildings up in the same spot?

Sunny said...

Thanks Smashbash
I also got a piece of fantastic news today, so it just reminds me of the ebb and flow of life :)

Amartel said...

Everlasting gratitude and admiration to all the heroes of 9/11, the ones we know about and the ones we don't and never will. July Fourth and Thanksgiving, these are official American holidays when we can celebrate our ideals and our heritage. 9/11 is an unofficial celebration of all the regular Americans who rose up out of nowhere that day and fought back, did the right thing, hung in to the bitter end, comforted, assisted, coped, tried and tried harder. This is important, especially in these times.

Amartel said...

The Ragey Wordy Thing whose comments focus obsessively on himself is an emotional parasite.

dia papaya said...

@SCat07:

Thanks for sharing some happy memories of WTC too. It's so easy to forget those. That area was like a mini city inside NYC.

And woo hoo to living your life differently!

I loved @lucy's comment about quiting and creating a new life that made her happy! That's what it's all about. We need to savor every day.

ReesesPeace said...

I've been coming back and reading what people are sharing...so many beautiful comments. I've been crying while reading the comments from people who were there, lost someone...I just cannot imagine. Hugs, peace and love to you all.

I've found a comfort in seeing others are still affected by this: Thank you all for sharing. <3



















Agent**It said...

It does not take "balls" to state 9/11 was an inside job. It was not and if Clinton had done his job there would not have been a 9/11. It does take some education and experience to understand the larger complexities.

Tuxedo Cat said...

@BettoroffSingle,

This is all paranoia and delusions talking.

You need to get assessed and treated.

You are wasting your intelligence and energy on this misfocussed anger and hatred.

You do have a valid complaint in there, in that you were discriminated against as a male secretary.

People are not going to take it seriously, though, when it is surrounded by so much histrionic vitriol. Any valid issues get lost in all the acid.

If you were to receive proper treatment for your problems, you would be able to express them in an appropriate forum, not this thread where everyone is remembering this horrid day in your country's life.

Is this what your mother would have wanted? Would this have made her proud?

shauniebear said...

*Additional comment: I was on rounds at work today and one of my favorite little patients (a six year old with an inoperable brain tumor) asked me if I had taken care of anyone on 9/11 that needed help. I told her I was having my baby that day, so I didn't. she hugged me and told me that I was still her hero and she wanted to help sick kids like me when she was "big"...that will be a 9/11 memory I will always cherish.

Sunny said...

@Shauniebear
I do the ugly cry every time you talk about your little patients. I pray these little guys always keep hope, and strength for their parents dealing with their children's grave illnesses. Thank you for the work you do

Thank you everybody for sharing today

dia papaya said...

@Shauniebear:

What a sweet and tender moment! Hugs to you and your daughter and all your little patients :)

I think your daughter must be a strong one to come on 9/11. She was balancing out all those who left too soon. She's your special earth angel!

SCat07 said...

@Sunny: Good, I'm glad it helped :-). Sorry to hear you had some bad news today :-(.

@smashbash: It was definitely a unique set of buildings. I think it's good that they're building a new tower in the old ones' place, but I personally would not want to work there if there was a chance it could happen again. I actually went to the WTC Memorial last year & got a glimpse of the new (Freedom) tower up close. The whole area (memorial + tower) is very well done, so serene.

@dia papaya: So true! And I try to remember things like this because I'm sure it'll come in handy if I ever have to tell the story to the young uns when I'm old & grey :-). (& thanks for the woohoo!)

SCat07 said...

@Shauniebear: Awww, that's a great story! :-)

SCat07 said...

@Roman Holiday: Thank you, yes I thank God all the time for protecting me. But it saddens me when I think of those who weren't so lucky :-(.

shauniebear said...

Aww, thanks ladies! I gave extra hugs to my little people at work and my special little person at home. I hugged her extra tight tonight and got teary eyed (she was quick to tell me how much of a "baby" I am..kids!)

That being said, I just hope everyone gives their loved ones a special hug every day (not just today)..I see all too often how fleeting life can be. Damnit, I stayed composed for most of the day but now I'm doing the ugly cry! Love all you girls! (and boys!)

smashbash said...

Shaunow- so precious. Your a wonderful lady and I fabulous mommy! Have a great night. :)

smashbash said...

My phone replaced shaunie! I am so sorry :( bad iPhone skills.

Agent**It said...

Shaunie, Please put your avatar back up ?.It gave me comfort and I could find your comments easy.

Just like Lib, if I lose her pit picture, then how am I to remember how much I love a Fish Called Wanda?

Bless you for your work.

smashbash said...

And a fabulous mommy. This is my sign to be done for the day. Thank you for the wonderful work you do with all those precious little humans. It is so sweet to see you are a guiding light for them in their darkness.

Everyone have a good night.

Frufra said...

This thread made my day. The stories we share mean so much to me. Thanks, guys.

Melody Clark said...

Twice I stood on the top floor of both those towers. I think about the people who ran the little burger stand up there. I remember the faces of janitors who were working. I recall the elevators. I remember voices from offices we passed.

I wondered then as I do now, how many of those people are gone.

That's not patriotism in any plastic sense. It's the only kind of patriotism that counts. I'm not a one-generation American. I'm part-Cherokee and the rest of me is British from 200 years ago. My only real ethnicity is American. So, yes, this day hurts me a lot -- REALLY hurts me.

I should also point out I nearly lost many friends and did lose two.

So Groovy, fuck you. Sorry, just fuck you. You may have no sense of patriotism, but this is the only country I have. This day hurts.

Melody Clark said...

Oh, and I'm a lifelong liberal and political cynic.

Agent**it said...

Melody bless you.

Dagny said...

I was fifteen years old, a sophomore in high school in a small farming town in OR. My mother woke me up early and we watched everything happen together on a live feed, including watching the second plane hit and both towers collapsing. We were so glued to the TV, we were both late for school/work and didn't even care. She had just taken me to Philly for a vacation, which was my first time flying. My return flight was out of Dulles on Sept. 3. I still have that ticket stub.

I got to school and, like everyone else here, noticed how quiet everything was. We all spent the day watching the news in every class. I remember that my mom and I, who had both only watched TV occasionally prior, literally did not turn the TV off for a good month afterwards. I don't remember if I cried that day; I might have still been in shock. I think I was in shock for months afterwards, which I still can't quite explain as I'd never been to NY, didn't know anyone who had died, &c. The only connection I had was that I was American as well. Looking back, it seems to me like I, and the rest of the country, lost our innocence together on that one tragic day.

There are certain mental images that have stuck with me, images that are so clear it seems like no time has passed at all. I remember reading the news ticker's announcement that Giuliani had asked for 25,000 body bags in the immediately following days because no one knew exactly how many people had died. I remember some man, whose name I forget, being interviewed on the news, saying that he was employed at Cantor Fitzgerald, a firm whose offices were on one of the top floors. He had taken the morning off so that he could take his daughter to her first day of kindergarten, and as a result was the only employee in his entire office who had survived, out of somewhere near 700 people. I watched this man be so struck with grief that he broke down, openly sobbing, on national TV. I remember shots of people in other countries holding candlelight vigils, including someone in Israel holding a sign that said, "All of us today are USA". I remember members of Congress standing on the steps of the Capitol building, holding hands, singing "God Bless America".

Mostly, I remember this strong, indescribable feeling of unity it seems we all had. It seemed to me that everyone was nicer, kinder, more grateful, and in a strange way less cynical. For a brief moment, we stopped being labeled and divided. It didn't matter if we had differing views on religion or no religion at all, what age or gender we were, whether we had an R or a D after our names, where we lived or what we wore. We had all gone through this horrible tragedy, even if we weren't directly affected, and we'd gone through it together, and survived by relying on and helping each other. And perhaps more importantly, we were all Americans. This day is difficult for me to relive, as I'm sure it is for you all, probably even more so. But perhaps after we grieve today, we can focus on that feeling of unity again. Maybe this day can remind us all of who we were on September 12th, and as we move forward we can strive to be those people again.

I'm sorry this comment ended up being a novel. Thanks for listening to me, and I sincerely want to thank you all for sharing your stories and perspectives. It's been said before that we are a family here, and I appreciate the rest of you letting me be a part of it.

dia papaya said...

Brilliant Dagny! Just brilliant!

Thanks so much for your beautiful comments :D

ReesesPeace said...

@Dagny. Beautifully said. Thank you.

AmericanScrewball said...

I was asleep when my mom told me to turn on the TV. Seeing all that rubble on the news was disastrous. The worst is over. But I fear for what's happening in Syria.

SCat07 said...

Good night all, thanks go indulging me & my stories :-). It helps w/the healing. I think I post every year in the anniv her n CDAN. Glad everyone is ok, have a good night.

SCat07 said...

Good night all, thanks go indulging me & my stories :-). It helps w/the healing. I think I post every year in the anniv her n CDAN. Glad everyone is ok, have a good night.

Sadie Goes Electric said...

Hmmm im glad i never fell down the same rabbit hole mister anti semetic up there did. Or to be fair maybe he was being funny with all that in some shock jock kind of way. Im jewish and not amused.

WUWT? said...

I have to answer the claim that Clinton could have done something about Bin Laden. To quote and paraphrase from FactCheck.org:
If an offer happened (it's been disputed), it was in 1996. "What is not in dispute at all is the fact that, in early 1996, American officials regarded Osama bin Laden as a financier of terrorism and not as a mastermind largely because, at the time, there was no real evidence that bin Laden had harmed American citizens. So even if the Sudanese government really did offer to hand bin Laden over, the U.S. would have had no grounds for detaining him. In fact, the Justice Department did not secure an indictment against bin Laden until 1998 – at which point Clinton did order a cruise missile attack on an al Qaeda camp in an attempt to kill bin Laden.

We have to be careful about engaging in what historians call "Whig history," which is the practice of assuming that historical figures value exactly the same things that we do today. It’s a fancy term for those "why didn’t someone just shoot Hitler in 1930?" questions that one hears in dorm-room bull sessions. The answer, of course, is that no one knew quite how bad Hitler was in 1930. The same is true of bin Laden in 1996."

Bush's administration had very clear warnings leading right up to the attacks. Clinton may have missed a chance at "pre-emptive justice" (knowing what we do NOW), but Bush also missed opportunities to alert us to the possibility and perhaps prevent it.

Inside job? NO. Aspects covered up and lied about? Certainly. But to think our goverment did this to us, ignores our real enemies. Our government clearly had ties and "friends" that ended up doing us harm, but acknowledging that is VERY different than saying our government orchestrated the whole thing.
Seriously, what would inside job mean? That our goverment hired suicide-mission people to hijack our planes full of our citizens and crash them into our buildings full of more innocent victims. No. I believe things were covered up in the scramble to hide various connections, but this was *NOT* an "inside job."
May God and memory comfort those affected.

smashbash said...

Thank you for sharing Dagny. I got chills reading your story. True words my friend.

E Gee Be said...

Wow, Cagney, shaunie, scat, melody and everyone earlier who shared their personal stories, you are all braver than I am.....our family lost two NYFD heroes that day, and yet, I lose it when I try to express myself about any of this. Thank you for putting my feelings into words.
And sunny, sounds like today may end better than it started, here's to hoping for that.

califblondy said...

I visited NYC in December of 2001 because nothing would keep me away. I could not go to ground zero then, but I will never forget the air, the smell, just a feeling.

After I got back to SoCal, I got so sick with a horrible cough. I stayed in bed for three days. I can't imagine what those first responders have to deal with.

I did go to the site on my next trip to NYC, but after having been in those buildings during other trips, it was just too much.

Alita said...

I imagine that people already starting from mental illness and potentially poor coping processes must have been pretty lost dealing.

I get frustrated at people making things like this 'about me' agreed too - and seriously no offense taken, it was nice to chat. Maybe I'll even be in a position again one day to chat on one of these posts before they're dead! (hazard of being in an alt timezone to a major percentage of the posters). Take it easy :)

Susan said...

Waste of skin and organs!

Tuxedo Cat said...

My heart breaks for you when you read this morning about the attacks on your US consulate in Libya last night, which took the life of your Ambassador Stevens and some of the people who happened to be with him.

My sincere condolences to anyone who knows or who is related to the people who were killed.

To attack any sort of embassy is reprehensible.

Jennmcn said...

I'm so sorry for the posters and others who lost loved ones, friends, and acquaintances on that horrible day. It is an immense sadness that may never go away.

I lived just outside of Detroit that day and no one knew if other cities would be hit. I had just bought myself a big screen TV the weekend before and it was delivered on Monday. I was alone except for my cat, my family so far away in California but my brother worked at the Pentagon. We had watched it on computer screens but on this TV it was evil carnage.

I was up all night, watching and waiting for the call that my brother was OK. He was but too many people lost loved ones that night. We all lost the security we has felt since Pearl Harbor.

This was a more insidious threat; one that could happen more than once, It had happened to the Twin Towers before with less damage. It left us all feeling so very vulnerable. Clinton had Bin Laden twice and didn't issue the kill order. Black Hawk Down should have never happened, Clinton could have issued the kill order long before it.

I was supposed to fly into Logan Airport on Sept 15th to spend a week celebrating my Birthday with my cousin. We being only children. It was three weeks before I could fly out...and we partied like we wouldn't ever draw another breath, that my friends is another story.

bumbumgirl said...

First - BettorOffSingle - What in the world is wrong with you? You are a disgusting human being. Your lack of compassion for those murdered on 9/11, for those who risked their lives searching for survivors, for those who lost loved ones is despicable.

Himmmmm – Beautifully said. Thank you.

That said - I was 23 at the time, about to turn 24 in 4 days and married the following month. I was unemployed, so I was home, sleeping. My mom called to tell me that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center. I said it was probably just a freak accident and then yelled at her for waking me up!

I couldn't go back to sleep after that, so I put the TV on and watched as the second plane hit the other tower.

My fiance called to let me know he was on his way downtown - he was a fireman and his house was one of the first ones on scene. The last thing we said to each other was "I love you. Be careful."

Tried calling my mom back, tried calling my dad, who was out shopping and had no idea what was going on, but couldn't get in touch with either of them. (They, along with my sister, both came home safe & sound.) Needless to say I was a mess.

I was one of those "I could never work in the WTC; I never feel safe when I am in there" people. I’d get laughed at, being told that the towers were probably the safest place to work. I was unemployed, so my neighbor’s son got me an interview with his company, Cantor Fitzgerald. It was for September 12th. He did not make it out of the Towers.

I'll never forget the first time I went back in to the City - it was 2 months after the attacks. The emptiness. The smell - it's still with me 11 years later.

I lost my high school sweetheart that day; my best friend, the love of my life. I lost countless friends. My neighbors lost both their children.

People who weren't directly affected that day find it easy to say "oh, you'll get through it" and "haven't you gotten over it yet?" You never really do, especially when you live and work here. You're reminded of it on a daily basis. Not a day goes by that I don't think about what happened, what was lost, what could have been.

Thank you to those who risked their lives that day.

Thank you to those who risk their lives on a daily basis for our freedom.

To those who lost loved ones that day, my heart breaks with yours.

Never forget.




Tuxedo Cat said...

@bumbumgirl So very sorry for your losses - that you lost so many family and friends. You were almost taken yourself. No doubt there were days you wished you had been.

They will all be waiting for you and you will be complete again...In the meantime all you can do is carry on best you can.


I'm doubly sorry that you've had to read through some thoughtless comments. In one case it is certainly a mental illness coming from someone who has a sadistic streak. If it doesn't stop, I imagine Enty will do some moderating soon.

Ms Cool said...

I'm a little late to this conversation. I can certainly say that by not living near New York and not losing a loved one in any of the attacks that I can never compare my feelings to the others who have. I feel a little strange discussing my emotions given how far I was from the experience. However, I am an American and the fear, horror, and emotional empathy engulfed me like it did the rest of the country.

I got married in late May 2001. In June, I went on a business trip to New York. I stayed at the Marriott World Trade Center from June 10-11. My meeting was on June 11 at the WTC and I went a day early so I could see the sights! I remember being nervous to fly because I flew the day Timothy McVeigh was being executed.

I grew up in a small town and now live outside Milwaukee. Going to the big cities is really exciting to me! When my cab pulled up next to the World Trade Center towers, I was super excited! I checked in, grabbed my camera did as much as I could on foot until I met my boss later for drinks and dinner. After an evening of seeing sites, we went to Windows of the World restaurant and had a final drink. We watched a thunderstorm roll in. It was one of the best days of my life. I immediately started planning another trip to New York with my husband.

Of course it entered my mind after 9/11 how lucky it was my meeting was on 6/11. I will never compare my horror and grief to others on that day. I have so much sorrow for the people directly affected.

I was late going to work and had the Today show on. I was watching the reporting of the first plane hit and called my mom. We were trying to figure out what was going on and my dad immediately said it was a terrorist attack. I couldn't figure out how it could be. My husband got up and was watching the news with us when we saw the second tower get hit. Then, of course, we knew.

I called a coworker and told her about the accidents as she was supposed to fly out that day and told her that perhaps she should cancel. She said I was ridiculous and added "what are the odds?" That was before we knew about the Pentagon and Shanksville.

I immediately got out the door as I worked in IT at a financial firm and I knew that our customers would be worried. However, when I got to work, most of just watched TVs and the Internet and saw the horrors of what happened to our nation. I worked many late nights to make sure our systems were up and safe.

Thank you for allowing me to discuss my emotions a bit here. I was worried that it might seem trite to express them but most of the people on here seem to be supportive of everyone's feelings.

I spent the week watching the History channel shows about 9/11 and I am in awe of how brave so many people were. I am sorry to those of you so directly affected. I hope time has given you some peace with your grief.

NYCGirl said...

I am so sorry for those of you who lost loved ones. Sometimes I feel guilty that I didn't know anyone who was killed that day.