Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Your Turn


The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended that oral contraceptives be sold over-the-counter because prescriptions present “an unnecessary barrier to contraception for women." Do you think the pill should be sold over the counter?


123 comments:

hag said...

Yes!!!!!!!

donner said...

yes!

me said...

Absolutely!!!

lilivonshtupp said...

YES!

LottaColada said...

Omg yes!

StewMcG said...

While I'm all for easy access to cheap and affordable contraceptives, I hope the packaging will include all necessary directives (i.e., taking at the same time each day increases effectiveness, the pill's only 97% effective when taken correctly all the time, etc.) and that the women will actually take the time to read them. At least, with a doctor, they usually go over all this before they give you the prescription.

I say that as a woman who has 4 children (and 3 were conceived while using birth control pills consistently and correctly - apparently I'm one of the 3% they don't work for.)

Jeneral said...

Absolutely!

Carolyn said...

Holy hell, YES!

Marisa said...

As they say, "if men had periods, tampons would be free."

If men had to take birth control, contraception would have been available over-the-counter at its inception.

About damn time.

The Mayor said...

Condoms = contraception
Contraception used on a man; condoms.
Over-the-counter; making contraception easy for men.

BC Pill = contraception
Contraception used by women; the pill.
Prescription only; making contraception difficult for women.

If men needed to take an oral contraceptive to prevent pregnancy, it would be over-the-counter by now.

There is no reason why it shouldn't be O-T-C. You can't "overdose" on the pill. The side effects are minimal. Women need to protect themselves and they shouldn't have to jump through hoops to do so.

ButterKwup said...

I agree with this to a certain extent. It should probably be something that you need to be 18 to buy. Teenagers should still get them through doctors ( or older sisters etc) because they will be less likely to read directions thoroughly beforehand and it would be safer to have someone else imparting some kind of knowledge to them.

fancyscreenname said...

Sure. I have a slight issue with younger minors being able to purchase them without parental approval though.

lazyday603 said...

Yep. I also think ED pills should be distributed free if only to make them unprofitable so the TV ads & internet spam will go away. I'm willing to pay a little more in taxes to not have to be inundated with woodie pill advertising everywhere I turn.

Vera L- said...

yes, OTC! I'm sure they will be priced out of reach for most people (teens). I was paying $30-$50 each month for them in the mid 1990's.

Pogue Mahone said...

They are dangerous(they can cause heart attacks,strokes and blood clots) and should not be sold over the counter. They need doctor's monitoring and should be only available by prescription.

Tru Leigh said...

Hell to the yes!

I wouldn't stop there. If the so-called right to lifers (who care more about embryos than they do about live women) really wanted to stop abortions, then they should advocated free contraceptives on demand. I'd give free birth control to everyone on demand. I'd drop condoms from helicopters. I'd have diaphragm kiosks. I'd give away IUD in cereal boxes.

But that would never happen, because that might encourage people to have S-E-X. And the dirty little secret about the right to life movement is what they really want to do to legislate morality.

The Mayor said...

I don't understand the idea that you should be 18 to get over the counter BC - sex isn't dangerous or a hazard to your health. When you're ready, you're ready. Some girls are mature enough to be sexually active at 15, and some aren't ready till 22 - they shouldn't need parental approval for something that protects their health and guards them against unwanted pregnancy.

Miranda said...

Damn straight it should.

Elissa said...

@The Mayor, the difference is that condoms don't alter a man's hormone level, and every man pretty much uses them in the same way. The pill comes in many types and dosages, and a woman's doctor is the best person to decide which is appropriate.
Not to mention that there are many women that should NOT take them; doctors should be the ones to decide that. My childhood best friend was hospitalized with blood clots as a teenager, and still isn't allowed to use them.
I hate to go against the tide here, but I think making them available over-the-counter is a bad idea. If reality television has taught us anything, it's that there are far too many stupid young people out there.

rhinovodka said...

I still think one would need a doctor to determine the "right" kind for each individual, so it would need to be regulated somehow. The last time I took the pill, I got severe migraines, so maybe some of the lower hormone ones would be better for this?

Jingle Belle said...

There are potentially lethal side effects to the pill (i.e. blood clots), so that's something that would need to be considered.

Also, it may become MORE of barrier to contraception for some women. My daughter is only able to use contraceptives because they are covered by my drug plan.

Barton Fink said...

Marisa, that reminds me of "If men could get pregnant, abortion would be a sacrament."

Terri said...

I don't. I have a hormone imbalance and have to be on a specific type. Being on one with a different make-up would have made made me infertile or caused me to ovulate.

That being said, I think that doctors should be able to prescribe them for longer than a year at a time.

Darkmyst said...

No because there are serious ramifications with taking the pill if smoke or have high blood pressure and are over the age of 35.


I'm on the side that birth control should be easily available and inexpensive but the pill is something that has significant enough risks that it should be used under a Dr's supervision.

Jennifer H. said...

I've always thought if men could get pregnant, there would be an abortion clinic on every corner. And they'd probably get free Viagra for going.

eris hilton said...

Jesus christ yes, they should be putting them in the water supply in some places.

eris hilton said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Marisa said...

Yes, because god forbid a woman's hormone levels change without supervision! Oh no! (sarcasm)

There are lots of over-the-counter things that can kill us (see: Big Macs, cigarettes, CARS), but the decision is left to the consumer. Slap a big ole' warning label on the pill pack and call it a day.

Renoblondee said...

No. It changes your natural hormone balance. The pill has side effects that your doctor needs to be aware of. If you have high blood pressure that needs to be monitored with the pill too. I'm on the pill myself, and I've had to change it up for the right kind. You and your doctor shoul do this together. What average person would know which kind is right for them? I do research, but so many people wouldn't do that.

seaward said...

I do think there should be less barriers & it should be easy to get, but I also agree with rhinovodka about a doctor helping determine which type is right for which individual.

Marisa said...

God, this generation is full of pussies. (no pun intended). Fucking take responsibility for yourself. If it does become available over the counter and you have questions about the pill, you ask your doctor. You don't need the government to make it harder to access. That's just laziness and irresponsibility on the individual's part if they have questions/concerns, but take it anyway without asking/addressing.

surfer said...

I'm with Elissa.

I do think birth control should be more accessible, but over the counter, no.

There are many different types of pills, including different strengths. Some pills are the same strength from start to finish, others change depending on the week.

Some pills are estrogen & progestin, others progestin only.

I really believe a doctor should be the one to determine which pill would be best for you.

As others have noted, there can be terrible side effects, and not everyone is a candidate for this form of birth control.

SusanB said...

Agree with those who say no. Your MD needs to go over your medical history and also do followup in case there's a problem. It's not like taking aspirin. I'm all for it being easy to get however, but medical supervision is necessary.

spacecowboy78 said...

Yes and no. As a pro choicer and former man whore in my younger days, there's no reason that women shouldn't have the same ease of access to BC that I, as a male do.

As a physician, there would need to be some type of regulation or at least initial exam to establish what works for who, as rhinovodka said. Some BCP's will have adverse side effects for some, so you can't completely take a physicians opinion out of it.

As a realistic US citizen, there is going to be mad backlash to this by many groups saying it will encourage sex amongst teens and all that...which is why a minimum age to obtain should be established. The average age for loss of virginity is around 16, and you can drive a car to the pharmacy then in most states, so that seems a good age to require proof of. Of course that doesn't stop a younger girl from getting an older friend to buy it, but is probably the best way to attempt compromise for all interested parties.

EmEyeKay said...

YES. Absolutely.

JSierra said...

Fuck no. It definitely needs to be made more available but you need to have a chit chat with the doctor before taking something that completely fucks with your body like birth control does.

Birth control isn't Tylenol or Nyquil. It fucks with your hormones and different people react differently. I reacted like a psychotic bitch.

fancyscreenname said...

I take that back and agree with everyone who says no because of how risky / dangerous it can b to purchase your own BC.

@mayor.....18+ because of the potential dangers inchoosing the wrong kind. Not because of sexual immaturity.

Patty said...

Typically, OTC is not covered under health/prescription plans where the pill is. It may be more available, but it may also become more costly. Plus, as so many have mentioned, there are the different dosages and hormonal needs of women. Not like it is Tylenol, with a one size fits all.

Tammy said...

I am fine with the pill being OTC as long as they take suing for side effects completely off the table, end of story.


It's time to make personal responsibility part of choice.

donner said...

There are terrible side effects from lots of OTC medicine and we sell it all day long. Don't OD on Tylenol or Aspirin, either.

People are going to do what they're going to do.

Why should the 99% of people who are responsible medicine-taking folks be penalized for the 1% who can't handle the dosage? Stop nanny-staing the country. Geez.

NomNom83 said...

Yes.

As with any medication, it should be recommended to talk to your doctor before choosing which form of BC you use. Considering the risks people run with using other OTC meds, BC doesn't present some ground-breaking danger to the public: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/health/medical/health/medical/treatments/story/2011/08/Overusing-over-the-counter-drugs-carries-risks/49794608/1

jax said...

all these side effects people keep talking about are rare and minimal, no more dangerous than the side effects found in a bottle of advil.
It only takes ONE person to experience a S/E for them to have it on the package. ONE.

Those facts are outdated and have been proven to be a very minimal risk. I get migraines, used to smoke and come from a family with heart disease and i've been on Alesse (the low dose) since 2003 with no issues whatsoever.
oh and I'm 38.

My doctor also informed me on my last visit that the pros outweigh the cons when it come to warding off breast cancer etc.

But yes, let's make it harder for teens to get contraception by putting an archaic age limit on it.
That's totally realistic. Enjoy being a grandparent at 40.

Boadacious Betty said...

Free, safe contraception and advice, as available in the UK, should be a basic human right worldwide for all who want it :)

yodelay said...

@Marisa, you took the words right out of my mouth, or fingers as it were. If cigarettes are sold OTC, then BC pills are safe with a warning about tue blood clot thing.

I just can't with people who think they can control other people's lives, who think women are so stupid they have to be protected from themselves, or that you can control teenagers' hormones. People in general, across all cultures lose their virginity sometime in their teens. Get over it!

Lurky Loo said...

I know most everyone wants to say yes but there are complications that can arise with the pill. I mean we are not talking about curing a headache but something that regulates your reproductive system. It can cause blood clots, and with Yaz weren't there issues with that as well?

Funny...I think most of the people that say yes sell it over the counter would also be the first to sue the drug companies if complications arose.

jax said...

let's not forget you can make meth out of shit in your medicine chest,bought OTC.

i'm with you Donner. Nanny states indeed.

How many teenage girls have the money or courage to go to their family doc without their parents knowing to get the pill? almost NONE.

You know what else fucks with your hormones? Pregnancy.

AndrewBW said...

I want to say YES!!! to everything Tru Leigh said above.

Elissa said...

@yodelay, the blood clot thing is but one of many health issues to consider; the fact that you don't seem to know that merely bolsters the argument that not everyone should have access to the Pill.

It's not about people "thinking that they can control other people's lives", it's about HAVING control over other people's lives. Parents are responsible for their children's safety, and it's ludicrous to take that responsibility away from them simply because teenagers are able to be sexually active. If a 14-year-old girl can't get a freaking Tetanus shot without her parents' permission, should she really be allowed access to a medication that could have deadly side effects, just because it has to do with sex?

VIPblonde said...

Yes, the pill should be sold OTC, along with the morning after pill.

For the people stating a Dr visit should be mandatory first, hence the prescription, fair point. But think about how many OTC pain meds there are: Advil, Asprin, Excedrin, Motrin, Tylenol, etc. All of them do basically the same thing, but they all have different side effects and some people are allergic to one or more of them. If you're not sure which one you should be taking, you call your dr and ask. It would be the exact same premise with the pill.

Brenda L said...

If you're old enough that you are thinking or care about birth control, it's probably time to start getting some.

Mooshki said...

If the OB/GYN association is in favor of it, it's pretty clear the benefits outweigh the risks.

I also think condoms should be given out free at every pharmacy. Yes, it would cost the country a fortune, but it would be a drop in the bucket compared to the costs of unwanted children.

Maja. With a J. said...

Sell them over the counter with a warning sign and a scary picture of a woman crying uncontrollably for no reason!

I keed, I keed.

I think there needs to be more education involved, but that's kind of a blanket statement when it comes to sex, pregnancies and STD's.

Mooshki said...

But, I think they should have a massive warning label: do not use if you're a smoker without consulting a doctor.

jax said...

^this kind of thinking is outdated.
your children are already having sex by the time they need the pill!

Would you rather bury your head in the sand and pretend your 14yo isn't sexting,sending titty shots out and boning her 16yo boyfriend...or give her a tool for survival?

My mom gave all of us condoms in our stockings! "Do I like the idea of you having sex? No but I like the idea of being called Grandma at 45 or my child having syphlus even less. Don't be stupid, this isn't a right of passage but it's here if you cross that bridge."

I didn't use mine till I was 17, never been knocked up and consider myself very responsible. All my friends who did not have access to b/c or condoms ended up pregnant or with an std. Almost all had an abortion at some point.

And in no way am I judging them for going through those things but it's the reality! Sex is going to happen, please prepare them for for it instead of scaring them with the consequences.

Leviathan said...

I see no reason for Birth Control pills to be prescription medications.

jax said...

sorry moosh that wasn't directed at you.

Darkmyst said...

Let me put it this way.

Find me a single OB-GYN that will prescribe the pill to a women over the age 35 who smokes. You won't find an ethical one that will.

And(much my deep dislike) the personal responsibility ship left port in the country ages ago and it's not coming back. So stop throwing that one out there because it's basically a fantasy.

Roxy said...

A RESOUNDING YES!!!!!!!

surfer said...

I was horrified when a (female) doctor wanted me to try Depo Provera. For those who don't know, Depo is a form of chemical castration that they give to male sex offenders. When I mentioned this to the doctor, she was shocked, as she didn't know this. I told her to Google it and all the info was out there.

So here was a doctor tried to get me to use a very specific form of bc, and she had no clue what it would do.

And for the record, someone I know did decide to try Depo, and she was beyond despair. Not only did it completely kill her sex drive, it made her suicidal (one of her friends used it as well, and experienced the exact same side effects).

I have to disagree with those who say side effects are rare - they are not. The majority of people who use the pill have no problem, but there is a very high percentage of people who experience side effects, some worse than others.

Sherry said...

No way - one of my best friend had a stroke when she was 40 which was directly attributed to her still taking the pill. She will never regain use of her left arm.

jax said...

^bullshit. where are you getting your information? PLENTY DO and it has nothing to do with ethics!

The Pill has come a long way and most are low does now, your information does not apply.

I'd like to see the stats on how many women have died from these things in the last 5 years.

Ever hear of toxic shock? Know anyone who actually got it? Nope...yet they still warn you on the package...why? Because they HAVE to. Yet we still use tampons every month.

Stefa-fa said...

I wouldn't say side effects are minimal, look at the risks. BC pills can be deadly for some women, smokers, women with clotting issues, and so on. You are messing with your endocrine system and can really eff it up. I had a high school friend who had a stroke at 19 because of her birth control pills, and the fact she was a heavy smoker. I gained 40 pounds in three months and went into some weird psychotic state and nearly killed my husband when I was 23, there are plenty of risks and unless you see a doctor to be monitored having them OTC would open up companies to huge lawsuits if women suffer damage or death.

jax said...

that wasn't for you Sherry. I type slow and posts went up before i hit reply.

littlejenny said...

honestly, I couldn't care less... I happen to be allergic to birth control pills, so it's whatever. but I imagine that women who CAN take them would love this idea. so sure, anything that makes life a little easier :)

bflogurl said...

@Elissa- Well said!

I say No as well....

(And I am fully aware that other OTC meds can cause side effects/death but for fuck's sake- USE A CONDOM!!!!! You an get 'em at any store/gas station/restroom. Oral contraceptives don't protect against STDs so if it is the teenage population we are so worried about needing access to birth control they need to be using condoms and not the pill anyway. PERIOD.

AKM said...

I'm not sure. I see both sides, i.e. side effect happen with other OTC meds and THEY'RE still available OTC, BUT...it IS still a medication that can be a mess for women with the issues Stefa-fa listed, so...

I'm not sure. Thankfully I don't make the decision. ;-)

I'm all for BC in general being more accessible for all, though.

Elissa said...

@Jax, I'm not denying that teenagers are having sex, I'm not an idiot. But there is a HUGE difference between condoms in stockings and giving teenagers access to a pill that doctors often refuse to prescribe to certain women, because THEY KNOW better.
It sounds like your mother is/was smart and responsible. She seems like the sort of woman who would know your family's medical history, and would be aware of whether it would affect her daughters' ability to use the Pill effectively and safely. The sort of woman who would absolutely be against the use of the Pill if your family has a history of breast cancer, for example.
As a responsible mother, *I* would take my daughters to be fitted for diaphragms. Because *I* know that my father's side of the family is riddle with heart disease, but it's not something that my children would be aware of.
Mothers are allowed to be responsible. Why would you want to take that away from them?

jax said...

I agree Condoms need to be used too BUT-condoms break, don't provide FULL protection against STD's (herpes anyone?) and are NOT readily available when you are 15, hopped up on Red Bull and horny.

I'm talking about girls, honestly I could give a toss about teenage boys right now. It's the girls who get the stigma, the baby/abortion and the reputation. girls don't go out and buy condoms, they just don't. We need to give them the tools to survive in our world TODAY, not in 1950.

Thanks for the debate, people. I always enjoy hearing differing views even if we don't agree.

StewMcG said...

Surfer, I was on Depo-Provera for 4 years and besides gaining some weight (which wasn't a big deal), the only other side effect I had was that I didn't have a period the entire time. When I went off it, it took me a year to get my cycles back in "swing". It's primary use is as female contraception. Not everyone who uses Depo has a bad experience.

Me said...

here is the thing. now, with a Rx, BC in my house is free. if ita over the counter i will pay for that.

of people will follow instructions it would be a benefit to society as a whole though, so i SUPPOSE its a good idea.

jax said...

Elissa, because not everyone has a mother like that. Some don't have any idea about sex or contraception because their Mom's are in denial, don't want to talk about or are a freakin mess altogether.

I don't want to take that away at all but we need to have a plan in place for the teens with...shitty parents.

Empowering young women to make their own decisions about their sexual health shouldn't make you or anyone else less of a parent.

surfer said...

@ Stew - glad to hear about your positive experience, but you are wrong when you say its primary use is as a female contraception. That is just not true.

The majority of females use regular bc, not depo.

jax said...

i'd be happy if our Premier would just reclassify tampons and pads..right now it's taxable because it falls under "cosmetics."

Ya, our FEMALE Premier thinks feminine hygiene is a fucking luxury item.

StewMcG said...

Really, @Surfer, because according to the NIH it's primary use is female contraception: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0000283/

Also, it's use has drastically lowered the birth rate in many countries worldwide (India, for example.)

Looziana Magnolia said...

I like the idea of no prescription for birth control pills but it makes me worry that STDs will run rampant, and a whole lot of teens may end up infertile in future years, if they don't get the STD taken care of.......I dunno.

Elissa said...

Jax, I agree, waaaay too many children are being raised by crappy parents. But those teenagers have places they can go to, like Planned Parenthood (where they may actually end up paying LESS for birth control than they would over-the-counter).
Personal responsibility is a nice catchphrase, but it requires knowledge. I just don't think that teenagers are responsible enough to be making their own decision about something like the Pill.

Also, I fear this whole debate is moot; all it takes is ONE asshole teenage boy dosing his girlfriend without her knowledge, ONE teenage girl who is unaware of her family's tendency toward blood clots, etc., and the over-the-counter Pill will be a thing of the past.

Audrey said...

I'm old enough to remember when Advil was prescription only... :0

If anything the morning after pill should be available over the counter before oral bc is. The morning after is taken only once (perhaps twice?) whereas the bc pills have more prolonged effect on the body.

That said, I was taking bc pills until I was 44 then I got an IUD and I love it. No more periods either! :)

PotPourri said...

Yes and No...most people don't know how to take them. If they are not strong enough, you will get pregnant.

They should be free to everyone through any doctor's office.

megan00m said...

Yes. No brainer

Alicia said...

In my perfect world BC and THC would both be available over the counter. Right next to the candy isle!

megan00m said...

People who miss use them, miss use condoms too and cold medicine and everything. People who need and want will use correctly. As i am in my thirties, straight and childless. Being uninsured and single shouldnt Imply abstinence too. Nor should it even be considered. U want the poor, unemployed, uninsured to stop "sucking the teet of the rich" right side? Id say stop resricting our access educations, choices and full lives.

cyberisis said...

Maybe they should be OTC but dispensed by a pharmacist who makes sure the consumer is aware of how to take them, side effects and limitations. I hate the thought of them not being covered by insurance though. It might make some people less likely to use them.

yo yo said...

no no no! While I'm all for women's right in every aspect, I think pills like this need to be administered and monitored by a doctor. My friend had a stroke at 30 years old from a certain BC and I myself have had to many issues and was changed from one pill to the next before finding the right one. Without a doctor who can help you in finding the right one for your body, I think its a bad idea.

*karen* said...

@jax, I know two women who have gotten toxic shock before. One had it back in the 70s and the other girl was 12-13 years ago. Both were in high school.

Many of my friends are using different types of BC and all of them tried different types before they found the one that worked best for them. I got to hear LOTS about side effects: everything from weight gain to lack of a sex drive, to mood swings, etc. Women with a family history of breast cancer are at a higher risk when taking the Pill. Sure, make it easier to get, but don't make it OTC. I'd rather that women work with their doctors to find the best one for them and THEN be able to refill as much as they want.

Desiree said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Desiree said...

If this means teen mom will go away, then fuck yes!

Seriously, like anything else there should be precautions and strict guidelines. BUT teen pregnancy is out of control and considering I got pregnant at 16 I think that pills should be more accessible.

KAP said...

I have to say no to any drug-based contraception, but yes to any barrier method. There are risks to the pill. For instance, there is a higher risk of blood clot (which is a risk in general of the pill) in migraine sufferers, which is why I don't use it. My daughter is starting to have migraines and I wouldn't want her to take the pill without the knowledge of the increased risk. It has nothing to do with controlling her, but I want her to have the education to make a good decision - and REALLY don't want her to get PG.

Although I hope we are laying the groundwork for open discussion, I know that kids don't always discuss things like this with parents.

KAP said...

Someone said - If anything the morning after pill should be available over the counter before oral bc

I think I have to agree with this. Being pro-choice for others and pro-life for myself, I think every woman has her own choice and would rather see the morning after pill used by people who believe it is something they want than to see unwanted children born or abortions performed later in the pregnancy.

ms snarky said...

Yes, of course. With bad scary warnings, like cigarettes, since hormone therapy of any kind can cause blood clots, strokes, etc, especially in the presence of overweight, smoking, etc. But still, YES.

yodelay said...

@Elissa, I'm well aware of the side effects, so no need to condescend to me. The blood clot issue is just the most common of the rare serious side effects.

I know some parents want to have domain over their children's bodies until they are the magical age of 18 and become wise, but that is and has always been impossible. If your 14 year old is too stupid to read warnings and follow directions, they are too stupid to parent a human being effectively. And I for one do not like supporting teen parents via my taxes because their parents thought their precious babies would never get horny.

And as Mooshki said if the OG/GYN assoc says this is the best course of action, they are probably right. After all, didn't you just say Drs know best?

KAP said...

Ms Snarky. I have to disagree. There are all of the warnings against smoking and drinking and kids think they are invincible and those things happen to other people. I think medication is something that needs to have explicit conversation and not just a warning or a pharmacist asking two or three screening questions. Kids will just lie anyway. I realize it should be easier for grown people, so I also agree that contraception should be free or very low-priced through Rx, but I think free from the neighborhood pharmacy could be more risk than it is worth.

WTF do I know. I seriously plan on encouraging my daughter to have an IUD as early as she wants contraception, and is medically safe. Of course, abstinence is my main encouragement, but I am not stupid. I was a virgin until I was 21, but most of my friends were not and several of them got pregnant when they didn't want to or mean to.

Groovy said...

Yep. I personally don't take them because the excess estrogen makes me ill but if someone else wants them, I say more power to them. In the past I've gone without simply because I could not afford to go to the doctor.

Lucas said...

I would seriously like to know why women don't just make guys wear condoms. I promise you that if you make it clear it is a deal breaker men will do it (although some of us believe in using them religiously regardless of whether our partner is on BC).

car54 said...

oh hell yeah. figure out the details to make sure the proper instructions are given but make it easier/less costly to get for sure.

KAP said...

First, the obvious - even if you wear one, it is not fool-proof.

Second, I am only thinking of teens here and not grown women, but if you are nervous and it is your first time or you are very inexperienced yet still eager (and afraid that he will dump you if you insist) then I can see how girls will not insist and it only takes that one time to get pregnant when you don't want to. Also, there is a lot of misinformation still running around like you can't get pregnant the first time, or if he pulls out, or if you are standing up, etc.

kelgela2 said...

There are condoms for women.
I would say yes to the over the counter, but the doctors would have to tell you which type to use.
Or keep them prescription, but lower the damn prices. I don't want to pay $100+ just because I don't have insurance anymore.

MadLyb said...

Yes. My daughter's friend lives in Utah, has to go to several different pharmacies just to get her birth control prescription filled. Ironically, these religious zealots who are so bothered by premarital sex have no problem passing out Viagra like it was Skittles. No questions asked. I see what you did there, misogynists.

smash said...

I have used condoms everytime for 3 years and never had a problem. Birthcontrol made me bloated, tired and ill all the time. I got it for free at planned parenthood in Wa state. It was NOT hard. If other states embraced planned parenthood and programs like it I don't we would be having this discussion. Or you know, buy condoms.

Cee Kay said...

Wait, don't different people need different strengths of hormone? If that part of things was cleared up (like a simple blood smear to detect what type you need or something), then absolutely yes!

MAC said...

@cyberis. I think this is a better way too. This way the pharmacist may explain any side effects, the waiting period before they are effective, and any drugs that may cancel the effectiveness. My concern is that real young girls (12-13) may start taking them for all the wrong reasons (ie: making your boobs bigger, etc). I went to planned parenthood when I was 16 and got them. I think that when you have to get a prescription for them it introduces you to the idea of annual exams and women's health along someone explaining about STD's. What happens if you are already pregnant and start taking them (seriously, I don't know)? With all that said, I'm not against them being OTC, but I do have some questions/concerns.

Renoblondee said...

When I was 15 I went to Planned Parenthood by myself, w/o my moms consent and got on the pill. For free. It was the 80s. You can't do that still?

Renoblondee said...

N/M I see people already talked about that.

Henriette said...

I thought the morning after pills were over the counter now? I say "yes"! I also think the different doses should be available.

I got on the pill when I was 18 from Planned Parenthood too. It was 1988.

Ms Cool said...

As someone who had pulmonary emboli due to the birth control pill, I highly recommend that it be prescribed by a doctor. As mentioned above, the risks need to be discussed with the patients - especially young women and teens.

feraltart said...

I say yes because some girls are being raped by their fathers, so they never get to go to a doctor. This way they at least won't get pregnant.

smash said...

I also got free BC in Idaho at the planned parenthood. When I had a job and when I didn't have a job.

Egyptian Ankh said...

Yes, yes, yes!!! Absolutely! Think of all the teen pregnancy that could be diverted if they were OTC.

CrazyCatLady said...

This is why Im thinking they should still be by prescription. Obamacare covers a bug chunk if the cost now (my 90 day supply is free) and too many women are clueless on the proper way to take it (I.e. what you described above)

CrazyCatLady said...

This is why Im thinking they should still be by prescription. Obamacare covers a bug chunk if the cost now (my 90 day supply is free) and too many women are clueless on the proper way to take it (I.e. what you described above)

Egyptian Ankh said...

**averted

Popnursing said...

We are so concerned with the risk of blood clots for smokers over 35 on the pill - as opposed to the risk of lung cancer for smokers over 35 on the pill. Shit, if I can buy smokes OTC, I should prob be able to buy birth control OTC....

Tuxedo Cat said...

No, I don't think so - I think it should be at least prescribed by a nurse practitioner, and the patient should have to go in once a year or so.

There are certain people who should not be taking birth control under any circumstances.




DrunkenBlogger said...

I'm going with NO, with a side of "make it easier to get." I've tried several oral contraceptives (due to PCOS) and at least two of them had serious side effects. These are hormones that can fix/mess with your body, and talking to your doc about things that can fix/mess with your body should be a part of your medical history. It's not like taking fenugreek, it's taking something that can change your hormone profile drastically.

That said - it NEEDS to be more widely available, and with ZERO stigma attached, and no co-pays. This BS about women taking BC pills are sluts is just some more misogyny. I have PCOS and have taken BC - as a married woman with 2 kids and a husband who had a vas 10 years ago, am I a slut? That needs to stop. Right. Now.

Oh yeah, and on my husband's former health insurance, the copay for bcp was $30/mo, while the copay for Viagra was $15. Niiice.

Peekwa said...

I know I'm late to the comments, but my concern would be lack of gyno exams for young women. If the only reason they go to get a pap every year (and yes, I know they are now saying you may not need one every year if never abnormal) is to get the next year's prescription, then to me that is worth not having them over the counter. Too many young people think they are invincible and they' wouldn't take any preventative measures if not forced to.

dia papaya said...

No! Bad idea. There are too many types of BC pills and too many possible side effects / interactions. A yearly gyn exam is important for basic wellness. I am a supporter of universal healthcare and I hope exams will become affordable (or free) for every American. Access to healthcare is the real issue here. Don't circumvent the doctor bc it's too expensive. That's just asking for trouble.

lilo723 said...

While the idea of getting OCs OTC is nice, I believe they are best administered under a doctor's care. You just don't want people misusing the pills and then having unwanted pregnancies.

OMAMA is BROKO said...

I'm still perplexed as to why the sponge went off the market.

I do think the pill should be over the count, but just keep in mind all of the recent birth control options which are now filling the nightly tube with class action lawsuits (yaz, to name one).

BUT, as already mentioned, just about any chemical you put into your body has an effect, negative or positive. So, that risk should be up to the consumer.

smash said...

Yaaaaaa for sounds minds!!! I think oral BC can be easy to get and free with assistance from the state. Why is it sooo important it be over the counter.

TampaRN said...

I think an initial ObGYN consult should be mandatory, at which time a woman is given a card, good for say, 5 years, allowing her to purchase over the counter BCP. This would ensure, that women are evaluated to make sure they are appropriate candidates for BCP and continue to be.

Solus said...

Really? I think it is far better that teens have access to contraception, rather than potentially not being allowed to take the contraception due to parent approval - because they are going to have sex either way, no doubt about it.

fancyscreenname said...

@solus..yeah, really. I wouldn't want my daughter totake them without me knowing. But that is just my opinion. I am not all that emotionally invested in this topic, though. I could live with either choice, over-the-counter or prescription.

Perhaps teen girls that don't have access to BC should b using condoms. They are easy to get. They are inundated with safe sex talk these days.

Beta said...

YES
also the day after pill
also legalise abortion everywhere
and lots of sex-education campaigns

lakeuniongirl said...

Interestingly, I just went in for my yearly exam and my doctor mentioned that pap smears were no longer recommended yearly for women in monogamous relationships who had never had an abnormal pap in the past. Did not know that.