Monday, March 31, 2014

A 40 Year Old Deaf Woman Hears For The First Time

Science can be wonderful. To watch it happen is amazing.

14 comments:

Violet said...

I saw this last week, it's really moving. I'm partially deaf and when I got my hearing aids the difference was amazing. I couldn't even begin to imagine what it was like for this woman.

Leekalicious said...

@Violet What a beautiful clip. Violet, I'm so happy that we live in this time where there is technology that can make your world easier.

loopymommy said...

Violet, that is so wonderful for you! Yay!

Violet said...

Thanks @leek and @loopy. Mine's a progressive deafness so for most of my life until early 30s my hearing was fine. Nothing like this woman has gone through. I wouldn't even pretend. But yes, thankful to modern tech and the NHS that I can pretty much function 'normally' with my aids.

roxie said...

I am so happy for her...as I sit here and cry watching it.

NJ FireFighter said...

The things we all take for granted...

crila16 said...

Wow...this is absolutely amazing. It brought tears to my eyes.

Violet...I'm so happy for you too.

Becca Parker said...

Unfortunately, there's a substantial movement among militant deaf people that cochlear implants are evil. That deafness is a "gift"!
My guess is that within 25 years, deafness will be a thing of the past in advanced countries & blindness will be cured to some extent not long after that.

Runswithscissors said...

@violet, that is wonderful! Congratulations!
It is so moving to see this young woman.

rosa3 said...

Becca- the movement against cochlear implants is not among "militant" deaf people. It is a stance taken by deaf people who value and strongly identify the Deaf Culture which is a very tight knit group with a lot of history.

Both of my parents are deaf and every member of my fathers family is deaf from birth. No one in my family feels the need to get a cochlear implant because they, as people who grew up culturally deaf, do not feel they need to be "fixed" . This view is a stance taken by people who view the deaf as simply people lacking hearing.

Also, not every deaf person is a candidate for this surgery which means that deafness will likely not be a thing of the past.

It is clear that this woman in particular had some hearing previous to her surgery based on the clarity of her speech. There is a LOT of training and therapy that goes into a surgery of this magnitude which means that she is re-learning how to hear because the implant reroutes the signal to your brain.

I understand how these videos are inspiring but they leave out a LOT of information and lead to a lot of misconceptions. The main one being that a simple device can "cure" deafness.


auntliddy said...

Rosa, i dont think all deafness is the same at all. And i know the cochlear implant is not for everyone.

Interplanet Janet said...

OMG... crying my eyes out... SO happy for her...

Vicki said...

+1 Rosa.. totally agree with everything you said. I also have degenerative hearing loss, with a profile that most hearing aids or audiologists don't know how to make better. Also, I don't like how they make these types of videos infer that it's like 'turning on a switch' when, as you rightly say, there are months of learning required post-implant before you get to this 'revelatory' point.

KL said...

I knew little to nothing about deaf culture until I read KAsher In The Rye by Moshe Kasher. Both of the author's parents were born deaf. The book is not about deafness (it's about drug addiction) but a lot if revealed about the culture.

I agree that deafness is not something to be "cured" necessarily and I understand that not everyone wants or needs a cochlear implant. Also, it's my understanding that it's not a magic bullet. The implant does not allow people to "hear" the way naturally hearing people do.

With that said, for those who are candidates and choose this option, it's a lovely choice and being deaf in not being "broken".