Monday, December 19, 2011

Justin Bieber Never Believed In Santa Claus - What Do You Think?


Justin Bieber gave an interview to AOL Music and in the interview says that he never believed in Santa Claus. I know there are many parents out there who do the same thing Justin's mom did because they don't want to lie to their kids. I personally did not mind being lied to as a kid and still remember the day my mom told me there was no Santa Claus.

Justin said that "My mom always told me there wasn't a Santa. This was her logic: She thought if I grew up knowing about Santa then finding out he wasn't real, that it would be like she was lying to me. And then when she told me about God, I maybe wouldn't believe her."

I think believing in God and believing in Santa are two totally different things, but I am not going to get mad at a parent for being honest with their child, it just would not be my choice. What do you think? What is your Santa experience? Do you agree with what Justin's mom did?

53 comments:

mooshki said...

WHAT?! SANTA CLAUSE ISN'T REAL?! Gee, thanks for ruining my Christmas!

Jesse D said...

We just told my youngest daughter that there is no Santa because we want her to focus on the birth of Jesus, not crass commercialism. My 13 year old was completely overwhelmed as a youngster by my mother's overbuying - she would spend literally hours opening presents that I would put away for later use - we would take out new Barbies in August for her to play with. We're trying to keep it much simpler with the younger one. I wish we would never have told her about Santa because she seems a bit sad about it. :(

Bit dams said...

one of my kids made the santa/god connection. went down the list; so, no santa, tooth fairy, easter bunny, god. anyway..

do you remember, YEARS ago, there was a little girl that wrote a leter to some world leader asking for peace and it got a bunch of press. she later ended up dying i a plane crash (she was flying it) at 10. her mother did not do santa and that child had no tv or birthday celebrations. told the child she was meant for better things and that magical thinking was a waste of time.

hey enty; don't forget to post some reveals for kobe!

Doc Girl said...

Carrying on the Santa tradition in our house is very fun. However, I have always felt a bit uneasy when I imagine my kids finding out Santa is a fantasy. Of course the older they get, the more this becomes a real issue.

I have toyed with the idea of telling them straight out one day that Santa is mommy and daddy, but then I chicken out because I don't want to break their hearts.

I'm curious to see what other families do.

Krab said...

I always told my kids there was a Santa. They're 14 and 17 now and I still pretend there's a Santa. Why not? It's fun and harmless and the world needs more harmless fun.

DixieTheNoble82 said...

I don't recall my parents discussing whether or not Santa was real, with me. It just seemed like one year I believed & the next I figured it out, no discussion or questions asked - and I was ok with that.
Maybe it's because my mom is crazy but she was still labeling present "From Santa" into my 20's.

I told my daughter when she asked this year (she is 9) that Santa is whatever & whoever she imagines him to be & that his main job is to remind everyone to be kind & happy.

Jessica said...

Good lord, millions of kids have grown up believing in Santa until they were older, and they don't have breakdowns about being lied to. They don't become devil worshippers because God is all a lie.
It's a simple part of childhood innocence and it's a shame so many adults are have put all these philosophical meanings into it and ruined it.
Jesse D is a good example. Saying you told your child there is no Santa because her mother went crazy on gifts is silly. That is an issue with her mother, not the issue with Santa/Christmas. I guess you couldn't control her Mother so you took a part of her childhood away. Congrats.

Doc Girl said...

My nephew was traumatized by finding out Santa was a lie. He was seriously pissed at my sister and bro in law for lying to him all those years.

Lioness70 said...

My kids all found out who Santa was around the same age I did - 8/9.

I told them the story about the real Santa (I'm Catholic), and they said they're glad it wasn't all a sham.

Here's the site they read:

http://www.stnicholascenter.org/pages/home/

DixieTheNoble82 said...

Oh, and I could NEVER sleep on Christmas Eve...never. I was always too excited. This one year though, the year I "figured it all out", I swore I heard heavy feet falls on my roof.

Even then - being over trying to believe - a small part of me thought it could have been reindeer. The magic of it all, I think, is what mattered to me.

luckydog said...

I agree with Krab 1000% percent. Life is hard....kids deserve a little fantasy and FUN while they can have it.

louise said...

So one supernatural bearded grandpa is real and one isn't? I don't think it's up to the Beiber's mum to decide either way. He should be allowed to decide if God or Santa exist all by himself.

DixieTheNoble82 said...

Well said, @Louise!

RenoBlondee said...

We used the Santa tradition but always knew he really wasn't real, just fun.

Sonia in MO said...

When my daughter was 3, we went to Walt Disney World and she had the obligatory pics taken with all the Princesses. She later said to me after seeing Cinderella twice in two days "Mom, those Cinderella's were different girls." Hmmm... thus the conversations began. She's six now, and very smart, and has figured out that our gas fireplace isn't quite big enough for someone to slide down, etc., and has noticed how there are different Santa's also, so we had a talk about people dressing up to be Santa's helpers & elves since Santa can't be everywhere. We also talked about how the real Santa lives in our hearts and we all become Santa's helpers when we do nice things for people and help others who need it. That ANYONE can be Santa who has a good and loving heart. She's smart enough to figure it out soon but as long as the "magic" exists for her I'm going to encourage it - we only get one childhood and I want hers to last as long as it can. I just want her to also realize that Santa isn't just about toys and gifts, but about having love in your heart for others and wanting to make a difference. If she learns that I will feel I've been a successful Mom. And if Santa can help, then more the better.

Aoife said...

I told my daughter that Santa wasn't real. She got in trouble with her friends at school for telling them Santa didn't exist. I never wanted to lie to her and wanted her to believe that if I was telling her something it was the truth.

Miss X said...

My dad was like this...didn't want me & my siblings believing in Santa because it takes away from the true meaning of Christmas. I think it's up to each parent to decide what they think is best for their family.

Patty said...

My kids figured it out themselves, around age 9. It was a huge releif on my part because we could now be more open about dicussing gift lists ahead of time.

And magical thinking is never a waste of time. Where would we be technologically if Steve Jobs mom told him to stop thinking nonsense about all the ideas he had floating in his head.

Jessica said...

All I know is you are raising one fucked up kid if he is going to "not believe" you for the rest of his/her life because you pretended there was a Santa when they were little.

Rita said...

Obviously, the mother did a good thing raising her son. The little kid is a strong believer in hard work. A lot of parents I know had opted out of the Santa magic. I was raised on it, but nowadays the children seem to recognize fantasy from reality.

And they still go have their picture taken with Santa at the mall every year. It's part of the tradition! No harm done. Parents raise their kids differently, that's all.

Pinky said...

I'm 45 and my mother -- to this day -- will not admit there is no Santa. It's rather charming and keeps the holiday fun. We're not religious -- so no complications on that front.

Róisín|nísióR said...

I'm the youngest of my family and I was the biggest Santa fan. Like seriously I thought the guy was THE GREATEST. Nobody told me he didn't exist so I figured it out when I was 12 (I'm ashamed...believe me). I was so sad for the whole of Christmas.

Even though I was so hurt (I know, overreacting..) I am so glad we had the whole Santa thing. I believed in a special magic for TWELVE years!!!! I wouldn't exchange that for anything.

I'm 20 now and so far no nieces or nephews so it's been 8 years without that special magic in this house, it's strange. Now Christmas is about drinking and people airing their problems :/

Megley said...

My kids are in their 20s and their gifts still come from Santa. My kids knew there was no Santa, because older relatives told them. As long as they knew they were still getting presents, they didn't really care.

figgy said...

I've never known ANYone to be traumatized from finding out Santa was a "story." In fact I remember talking to my Mom about why I didn't think he was real, she confirmed it, but told me not to say anything to any of my friends or classmates. I just remember feeling proud to have figured it out.

cheesegrater15 said...

Uh, I don't care? Really, Enty?

Sherry said...

I don't remember us being even told about Santa but then we were so poor we couldn't even afford to pay attention. I think we all turned out okay.

Seachica said...

There are a large number of people who grew up not believing in Santa - the Jewish population. And is anyone going to argue that Jewish kids grow up less immaginative or not believing in god or magic?

I think parents overthink things these days. Lots of kids grow up believing in Santa; lots don't. Neither are raising kids who grow up traumatized. Santa is a really cool tradition in our society, and it provides kids with great memories. Why not let everyone have some fun? And I say this as a Jew, who is happy to integrate a "hanukkah bush" and other non-religious things (Santa has nothing to do with christianity, folks!) into my december traditions. Kids are smart enough to recognize fact from fiction, and to see shades of gray instead of stark black and white.

And show me a parent who never, ever lies to their kids. I'll show you the biggest liar of them all.

Dishtlk said...

Seachica hit it on the head, parents over-think things nowadays. I found out at what seems to be the average, 8/9, and it was a friends older brother who ruined it for a whole group of us. We then conceited the plan though that we weren't going to tell out parents that we knew because we might not get gifts... Once I found out it didn't traumatize me in anyway, it's just part of growing up. Kids are also convinced Dora is a real person, do they freak out when they finally realize she is just a cartoon?
I have a crazy over-active imagination, I can imagine that the Santa fantasy only helped that and it's been hugely beneficial to me professionally.

Dishtlk said...

Conceited = concocted

EmEyeKay said...

I grew up not celebrating Xmas, so I was excited to celebrate holidays with my son, santa and all. He started questioning it around third grade, but I kept the belief alive until his older stepsister told him flat out there was no santa. He came home so mad at me. Now if I bring up santa he practically yells "there is NO SANTA, it's YOU". I think he's still a bit touchy :) I used to wrap presents from "santa" in different paper, I went to great lengths to perpetuate the myth. And I had SO MUCH FUN doing it! I even left him a note from santa one year, because this toy he wanted SO BADLY was on backorder, so "santa" wrote him that the elves messed up and he'd have to get it to him after xmas. I think he was six, so he fell for it. I still have that note. Aww, now I'm kind of sad. I miss that stuff.

Susan said...

Co-sign Seachica's post. Traumatized from finding out there's no Santa? Say wha??

I recall vividly how I found out: My scrawny ass was laying in bed on Christmas Eve next to my little sis who was sound asleep. But me, I was never a deep sleeper, and I was getting all worked up about the Big Day. So of course, in typical Susan fashion, I came down with a RAGING asthma attack because at the time my parents also rocked fur coats, adorned our house with real flocked Christmas trees (I'm getting itchy, just thinking about this) and my Dad was a chain smoker. Needless to say, I busted out of bed knowing full well I needed my meds like ASAP, and I saw the entire fam - parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, my big sis, putting together all the gadgets and gizmos around the tree. My dad swooped up my wheezing freaked out self and pumped me with my drugs.

I had a suspicion Santa Claus was a fraud, and that day just confirmed it. Of course, I never brought it up to the parents, who are Catholic, old school and do not talk about anything that has any philosophical meaning. And for my little sister, well the big sister just blurted it out to her one day in the bath tub.

Just all a part of growing up.

Rita said...

@Susan - I was traumatized when I learned where babies came from! The magic of a Kangaroo-like pocket opening so the doctor delivers the baby was forever smashed by that dickhead Frank when I was 11: he point blank told me that babies split the pu**y and push out of there.

Let me tell you, since my first sexual experience, I've been double raincoating it.

feraltart said...

My younger brother told me. I was quite happy thinking Santa existed. My mum until the day she died insisted Santa existed and gave Santa presents. I think it was great. This year my dad is coming to my house and it will be him, me and my husband. We love the smaller gatherings, it actually feels more like Christmas to me because we are so relaxed around one another.

Anonymous said...

I'm with Vicki, who cares? Do we have to pass judgement on everyone? Can't we let a few slide by?

ForSure said...

Such a socio-economic question, and most people don't even realize that side of it. Years ago I was a teacher's aide in an elementary school and after the break the subject of Santa came up and one of the kids said 'santa doesn't come to my neighborhood, he doesn't like the ghetto' or something like that. It was a poor school, so most of the kids nodded in agreement. These are kids who got two gifts if they were lucky, usually socks, underwear and a sweater.

I don't have kids, so it's not an issue for me, but if I did, I would not do Santa. It's just a story, and there are plenty of other stories out there that don't involve cartoon characters invading my home.

Rose said...

Lol Vicki. Right, what is next? Lima beans: How does Justin Bieber really feel about them?

Jolene Jolene said...

People sure like to take the fun out of a little thing called "imagination." For fuck's sake. Thinking your child will never believe what you say when they find out you lied about Santa?! Or, better yet, not wanting to follow the tradition because there are needy kids in the world who can't have the same? Why is this mutually exclusive? Why can't you teach your children truth AND imagination? Why can't you teach your children about fun at Christmastime AND the fact that there are people in the world who aren't as fortunate, so therefore it's important to do good things for other people? ...the fuck?

Del Riser said...

I can't believe I'm doing this, I am not a huge fan of the Bieb's. My kid grew up as I did believing in Santa until one day you just know it isn't so. We always knew Christmas was about the birth of Jesus, and Santa was about presents for us.

Here in Las Vegas Justin was just Santa for about 650 kids. He gave $100K to the school and sang in several classrooms and visited with kids, many of whom live on the street or in their cars. This school was highlighted on Ellen. He gave gifts. I'm sure the biggest gift was his being there.

When I was finally cornered about all the Santa's my daughter was seeing, I told her that Santa is the "image" of the Christmas spirit that lives in our hearts. It is the feeling of wanting to do something for someone else. We did a pretty graceful slide into a more real way of looking at things.

Susan said...

Del Riser - I love your post. That is a great story, and I love how you explained Santa to your daughter.

FS - Thank you for pointing out your experience with your students. That reminds me why it's so important to give to others this time of year, and really all year.

iheartjacksparrow said...

To those who say there is no Santa: Then how can NORAD track him every year?

www.noradsanta.org/en/

Anonymous said...

Bieber sold a Christmas CD and has the gonads to admit he never believed? Douche.

Dishtlk said...

Lmao, touché iheartjacksparrow

Murphy Brown 2020 said...

@Sussique, he never said he grew up not believing in CHRISTMAS. He said he grew up not believing in SANTA. I don't get why recording a holiday album makes the Beebs a poseur.

To the poster who pointed out that there are plenty of Jewish people (among other religious folk) who grew up without Santa in their lives and turned out just fine: I think I love you.

Even if you don't tell your kids that Santa is a farce, some kid on the playground will do the deed eventually. Might as well break it to them gently before they're taunted.

And there is nothing wrong with letting a kid have a big imagination, but feeling as if you're "hurting a kid's feelings" by letting them know the truth about Santa smells like child worship and First World Problems to me.

Snakeoiler said...

Jewish kid, grew up until age 5 in Milburn, New Jersey. The only story I can think of is that my mother told me not to break it to the (stupid) gentiles, because, well, I don't remember why.

Sue Ellen Mishkey said...

When I finally figured it out and confronted my mom about lying to me, she told me the story about St. Nicholas and I got over it, but maybe that only works with Catholics?

Personally, I think it's good to let children believe in magic and fairy dust because it gives you something lovely to look back on when you get older.

Sue Ellen Mishkey said...

@Seachica

I love that you busted out the hanukkah bush. I had Jewish friends when I was younger and they totally had one too. Classic.

surfer said...

Seachica - loved your post.

This Jewish kid was in the Christmas choir every year (elementary school), went to the Santa Claus parade (parents took me, obviously,lol) AND had my picture taken with Santa. Also, I remember many years my parents would load us into the car, and we would drive around looking at all the pretty decorations.

CJ said...

Well said, seachica!

Pssh said...

Seachica -- I do have a problem with your post. 1. The story of Santa Claus does have a religious background 2. I think it is sad when people who are of a different religion feel the need to "borrow" from others. You should celebrate your faith with your traditions. I don't have a Seder meal, just because I enjoy the spirit of it, but I do attend my friends'. I don't play with the "Christmas top" just because I wish I had a game like dreidel.

I worked in a JCC for years and nannied for a Jewish family for 4 and I respected them for celebrating Hanukkah and not having a "bush" or doing Christmas traditions just because. The littlest girl was actually so sweet and kept asking me if I believed in Santa (she was 5 at the time) I told her yes and she started to giggle. I asked what was so funny and she said nothing. I then told her I didn't believe anymore and she said, "Phew, I though I just ruined it for you!"

Jasmine said...

Blogger Louise said
"So one supernatural bearded grandpa is real and one isn't? I don't think it's up to the Beiber's mum to decide either way. He should be allowed to decide if God or Santa exist all by himself."

THANK YOU!

I totally agree. And personally, if finding out there is no santa causes kids to question other people they were told was real (like god) then this is all to the good. Questioning ANYTHING is good, what are religious people afraid of?

But yeah, I will definitely have a Santa thing happening with my future kids. As so many of you put it, that time is too magical and lovely to deny to them.

Murphy Brown 2020 said...

"I think it is sad when people who are of a different religion feel the need to "borrow" from others. You should celebrate your faith with your traditions."

There's something to be said for minding your own business and not really paying attention to how other people demonstrate their spirituality and/or traditions.

Lelaina Pierce said...

I found out at 6 (discovered a present), confronted mom, pouted a bit that she'd lied to me and then was over it. It did make Christmas a TINY bit less magical, but nothing extreme. I was always more disturbed at the kids that believed LONG after childhood (hee, sorry, MonstersInc! :))

Can't judge Bieber's mom on this one.

Some people I have known have gone ALL out in keeping up the Santa myth. Oh, the stories I've heard. And can we talk about the shelf elf?? I think it's a cute idea, especially for behavior modification BUT some mom's really go...above & beyond w/ that little guy.

@FS - That story reminds me of a my student teaching years...I was in an extremely poor school and had this kid that would NOT stop sleeping in class. When I talked to my mentor about it, she said he stayed up all night b/c his mom worked three jobs and he had no supervision. The kicker? His Christmas gift the year prior was a bed. He'd had to sleep on the floor before that. Really put things in perspective for me.

JMS said...

Smart woman! God bless her!

Stop lying to the kids!!!

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